CAMERAS Nikon D610 Review

Nikon D610 Review

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Nikon D610 Review

Home CAMERAS Nikon D610 Review

Nikon D610 Review

35mm entry-level DSLR D610 from Nikon

Almost a year after the introduction of the 35mm entry-level DSLR D600, Nikon is already announcing its successor model D610. There are no great innovations in this new model. The 24 megapixel DSLR with the FX format sensor now has a “Quiet Shutter” mode, which makes the mirror flip more smoothly, and a continuous shooting function that has been increased from 5.5 to 6 frames per second. After all, the recommended retail price has moved down by 200 euros and thus falls below the 2,000 euro mark.

About a year after Nikon made the digital 35mm format affordable with the D600, its successor, the D610, is already on the shelves. As is to be expected with such a short innovation cycle, the D610 brings only a few innovations. For example, the shutter has been completely redesigned so that slightly higher continuous shooting rates are now possible. What has remained, however, is an image converter in 35mm format with a resolution of 24 megapixels. Is that still contemporary today?

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Robust housing with good ergonomics
  • Very wide range of equipment including practical automatic systems
  • Automatic white balance with harmonious colors in artificial light
  • Excellent image quality, even at high ISO numbers

Cons

  • Full HD video with 30p or 50i only
  • Slow and unsafe Live View AF
  • AF fields too close to the center of the image

 

The Nikon D610 costs less than 2,000 Euros as an introduction to the 35mm format. [Photo: Nikon]

Moreover, the Nikon D610 is quite compact for a 35mm camera. [Photo: Nikon]

Nikon’s 36 x 24 mm CMOS sensor has a resolution of 24 megapixels. [Photo: Nikon]

On the back, the Nikon D610 offers an SLR viewfinder and a 3.2 inch screen. [Photo: Nikon]

Innovation of the Nikon D610 compared to the predecessor model D600: The continuous shooting speed was slightly increased from 5.5 to 6 frames per second. [Photo: Nikon]

The first dealers offered the Nikon D600 directly at market launch for just under 2,000 euros, currently it is even available for less than 1,500 euros and currently, used models for about 800. This brings the 35mm format into the affordable range for ambitious amateur photographers. Thus, the D610 is relatively priced as an entry-level model in the 35mm format, but functionally it is still positioned differently than an APS-C entry-level DSLR such as the Nikon D3200. With the D610, Nikon promises a particularly good picture quality, which according to Nikon is only possible in 35mm format. The CMOS sensor has a resolution of around 24 megapixels and offers a sensitivity range from ISO 100 to 6,400, which can be extended down to ISO 50 and up to ISO 25,600. As already mentioned, the continuous shooting function now reaches six frames per second. The new quiet recording mode with particularly dampened mirror impact is also available as a continuous shooting function, but the continuous shooting rate drops to three frames per second.

The D610 uses proven technology that was already used in the professional D4 model. For example, the Expeed 3 image processor with 16-bit data processing or the Multi-CAM 4800 autofocus module, which has 39 measuring fields and a high light sensitivity of up to -2 LW. Even lenses or lens teleconverter combinations with a speed of F8 can still be focused automatically. Exposure is captured by the 2,016-pixel RGB sensor, which even detects faces and optimally supports autofocus for 3D subject tracking. Furthermore, the case is made of a magnesium alloy on the top and back, and the D610 is just as well protected against splash water and dust as the D800.

The D610 films videos at a maximum in Full HD resolution (1,920 x 1,080 pixels) with 30, 25 or 24 frames per second. If the resolution is reduced to HD (1,280 x 720 pixels), an additional 50 and 60 frames per second are achieved. Practically, the Nikon can film in both FX and DX format, which extends the scope for design (digital zoom without loss of resolution and image quality). The stereo sound can be recorded externally via a connected microphone, the sound can be controlled via the headphone socket. Via HDMI, the D610 can even output uncompressed video for external recording without the displays that appear on the monitor. In addition, the D610 is capable of time-lapse shooting, but the interval shots can also be saved as individual photos.

The Nikon D610 offers 19 of these motive programs, which give you a little bit of an entry-level feeling. In addition, the Nikon has a built-in HDR function that automatically takes two images with different exposures and merges them into one image with increased dynamic range (more shadow and light drawing). The D-Lighting function is also on board, as are options for image processing and retouching, such as removing red eyes. These may occur when using the internal flash unit that the D610 has. External system flash units, which are controlled via i-TTL, can also be connected via the flash shoe.

On the back, the D610 has a 3.2 inch (8.1 centimeters) screen with a resolution of 921,000 pixels. It has an automatic brightness control. In addition to the live view, an electronic spirit level (virtual horizon) can also be displayed. The SLR viewfinder with glass pentaprism covers 100 percent of the field of view and magnifies 0.7x. The shutter is designed for a lifetime of at least 150,000 releases and achieves a minimum shutter speed of 1/4,000 seconds.

Optionally, the D610 can be equipped with many accessories, such as a GPS receiver or a WLAN module. The latter not only allows the transfer of captured photos, but also the control of the camera from the smartphone or tablet, for which you have to install the corresponding app from Nikon, which is available for Android and iOS. With the optional Camera Control Pro 2 software, the D610 can be controlled from a PC via USB cable. The optional MB-D14 multifunction handle, which can hold either the EN-EL15 battery or six mignon cells, promises better manageability in portrait format thanks to a second trigger and setting wheels as well as longer endurance.

Ergonomics and workmanship

The Nikon D610 already makes it unmistakably clear during unpacking: This is a photo camera. The case looks massive and solid, the robust impression is underlined by the full empty weight of almost 800 grams. Ready for operation and equipped with the lens AF-S Nikkor 24-85 mm 1:3.5-4.5G ED VR, the display of the balance oscillates at approx. 1350 grams – this camera is really no toy! It would certainly be even more massive if Nikon had not chosen a lightweight magnesium-aluminium alloy as the material. But once taken in hand, the sheer mass of the D610 is quickly forgotten. A slim but protruding handle gives it an excellent grip. And as with its predecessor, Nikon has arranged all the controls on the D610 in such a way that they can be reached easily and without contortions. The index finger automatically rests on the shutter release button, the thumb comfortably switches between the rear e-dial and the four-way rocker switch for controlling the main functions. Above all, Nikon also uses the space on the left of the back for controls, contrary to current design trends. Thus the left hand is not forced to inactivity, but can intervene lightning fast into the operation.

The handy mode dial is also intended for the left hand and is secured with a lock to prevent accidental adjustment. But the D610 is not only generous with its dedicated controls, it also provides very open information about current settings and measured values. Once over the opulently dimensioned status display, right on the top plate. And secondly, on the main display, which shows a very clear status display on request. That’s not all: Ten paramaters can be selected here and changed at lightning speed. One almost wished that Nikon had equipped the display with a touch function that gave direct access to the displayed parameters. But in this respect, the D610 is conservative, but it’s not a broken leg. It’s more likely that the display still won’t move. If you take pictures with the camera in Live View mode, you may be forced to perform unnecessary contortions, such as flower or insect macros. The display is very pleasing: With a diagonal of 3.2 inches (approx. 8 centimeters) it is almost generously dimensioned and has a very fine resolution of 921,000 pixels.

The rich equipment with switches and buttons as well as the interactive info view save many a way into the very extensive menu of the D610. That’s a good thing. This is because it takes some training time to find your way around here – the possibilities offered by the D610 are so varied. A comfortable way through this jungle of commands and options is paved with a very personal individual menu in which the photographer can clearly summarize the most frequently needed setting options. The D610 can thus be perfectly tailored to your own needs like a tailor-made suit.

The fact that the Nikon D610 is primarily a classic camera can also be seen when looking through the magnificent optical viewfinder. It is large and bright, here no electronics distorts the view of the motif. The viewfinder brightness, however, diminishes if not as bright lenses are used – like the 24-85/3.5-4.5 with which we mainly tested the D610. If you equip the D610 with the brand new Nikkor 58 mm 1:1.4G, the viewfinder image is hardly darkened.

Nikon has equipped the D610 with two slots for SD cards, they are located on the right side of the camera under a flap with a robust hinge. These two card slots offer security and flexibility. For example, the D610 records JPEG images on one map, while its raw counterparts land on the other. Or the second card stores copies of the recordings from the first card and thus provides a backup. On the left side of the camera there are several sockets for microphone, headphones, USB, HDMI etc. under robust rubber caps. Nikon states that the D610 is just as well protected against dust and splash water as the top model D800. However, the interface cover for the optional portrait handle MB-D14 on the underside of the camera must not be lost in this case. Exactly this could easily happen, because this cover is not attached to the case. Sony, for example, shows that this would be technically possible with the A99, in which the interface cover disappears in the battery handle.

Equipment

Externally, the D610 doesn’t differ from its predecessor. And even a glance at the equipment list reveals only marginal changes. Thus, the continuous shooting rate increases slightly from around 5.5 photos per second (fps) for the D600 to 6 fps for the D610. Another new option is the “quiet series shot” option, which absorbs the mirror impact particularly efficiently. This is made possible by a newly designed cap, which also clears up a problem of the predecessor: With the D600, there was sometimes increased abrasion in the cap mechanism, which could then deposit on the image sensor and thus necessitated frequent sensor cleaning.

Nikon has also improved the automatic white balance of the D610. It should now deliver much more natural results, especially with artificial light – read more about this in the “Image quality” section. The fact that everything else has remained as it was does no harm, however. Because the D600 was already so richly equipped with functions and setting options that hardly any wish has to remain open. This also applies expressly to less experienced photographers. There is a green AUTO symbol on the program selector wheel for them. In this mode, the D610 automatically takes care of appropriate recording settings. Alternatively, you can specify one of 19 motif programs. You don’t even have to worry about the flash – it automatically unfolds if the situation requires it.

But first and foremost, the D610 is a workhorse for photographers who don’t want to rely on all-round carefree automation. The camera offers you practically everything your heart desires or the respective situation requires. Whether a program automatic, the possibility of semi-automatic or even manual exposure control or exposure series – the equipment list of the D610 is so extensive that you have to search for a long time for a gap. Perhaps that one would wish for better arranged AF fields. The D610 essentially takes over the AF module of the D7000/D7100 with its 39 sensors (including 9 cross sensors). And then they crowd into the center of the field of view with the 35 mm camera. The focus speed, however, is completely ok. With the Nikkor 24-85/3.5-4.5, the D610 needs between 0.3 seconds in wide-angle position and 0.5 seconds at the long end of the telescope to focus and release. However, this only applies if the phase AF works when looking through the viewfinder. When the D610 is operated in Live View mode, it takes about 1.5 seconds for the AF to find its target.

The leisurely Live-View-AF proves to be a hindrance, especially for video recordings. The D610 only follows the focus hesitantly and above all strongly pumping. In general, the D610 doesn’t always appear to be up to date when it comes to video shooting. Although it records films in full HD resolution (1,920 x 1,080 pixels), the frame rate is a maximum of 30 full frames per second (30p). If motives that move fast are to be filmed, the D600 can probably record with 50 full frames per second, but the resolution is then limited to 1,280 x 720 pixels. But ambitious videographers can be happy about the fact that the D600 offers a jack socket for connecting an external microphone and that the sound recording can even be controlled manually.

There’s nothing to criticize about the rich editing features the Nikon D610 offers in playback mode. For example, the D-Lighting function also brightens up shadows that run in afterwards. Or the distortion correction fixes image errors of the lens. And with the perspective correction, falling lines can be compensated and tilting buildings can be erected. If you want to alienate your recordings, you will find numerous filter and special effects in the playback menu. And of course the D610 develops raw images to JPEG images if required.

Picture quality

The D610 takes over the 35mm image converter from its predecessor, which resolves 24 megapixels. And just like the D600, the D610 is also offered as a set with the AF-S Nikkor 24-85 mm 1:3.5-4.5G ED VR lens.

The image quality of the D610 is absolutely up to date even with the 24 megapixel sensor, which may not be quite as fresh as it used to be. Although their signal-to-noise ratio of very good 45 dB at ISO 100 decreases continuously with increasing ISO number, only the critical limit of 35 dB at ISO 3.200 is reached. Similarly, the luminance noise increases steadily, but also remains completely uncritical up to ISO 3,200. Nikon has adjusted the noise reduction very cautiously, which clearly benefits the detail reproduction: The texture sharpness remains very good up to ISO 3,200, only beyond ISO 12,800 does it leave the green range. Thus, the D610 prefers to allow some noise in the sense of the finest image details, which also remains unobtrusive thanks to its small grain size.

The input dynamics are not quite as outstanding. It is about 9 EV between ISO 200 and ISO 3.200 – some other cameras can do that better. The D610 to ISO 200 compensates for this with an almost perfect output dynamic of around 256 tonal value levels per colour and brightness channel. So the camera can’t process subject contrasts quite as well as some others, but it delivers images with the finest tonal gradations. Nikon has also well tuned the color rendering, the D610 reproduces colors on average very neutrally. This is certainly also due to the very high white balance accuracy. This also applies to the automatic white balance, which provides excellent results with the D610, especially under artificial light. The vast majority of cameras tend to reproduce the shots with a very warm, almost orange-tipped campfire atmosphere under incandescent light. Not so with the Nikon D610: The colors of such scenes are clearly more neutral, but they do maintain the warm mood.

The image quality of the Nikon D610 is without fault and blame. And what about the Kit lens? This was not quite convincing even during the test of the predecessor – and it stays that way. Although the resolution in the center of the image is a little bit dimmed very high, the resolution of the optics drops strikingly towards the edges. Powerful dimming alleviates the problem, but does not eliminate it. The zoom lens also doesn’t cut a good figure when it comes to distortion: in the wide-angle range, it is very barrel-shaped, at normal focal length and at the long end of the telephoto lens it is extremely cushion-shaped. In contrast, the edge darkening is okay, there is also nothing to complain about when it comes to chromatic aberration. But even the Nikkor 58 mm 1:1.4G can’t quite convince the D610 from a metrological point of view. With this high-quality lens, the loss of resolution at the edges of the image is also too high, and it also shows a little bad. The new 58er, on the other hand, is convincing in qualities that cannot be measured with measuring technology – for example, with its wonderfully soft bokeh, which at best reproduces circular light sources a little too almond-shaped with an open aperture.

Bottom line

Nobody really needs more camera – that could be the conclusion of the D610. Their image quality is excellent up to ISO 800, but even at significantly higher sensitivities they are still quite pleasing. The scope of features is huge, the handling can hardly be improved. So there is marginal criticism at best. For example, to arrange the AF fields, which only cover a small part of the image center. Nikon is also likely to improve its live capabilities, for example with a faster autofocus and a foldable display. The video functions are no longer quite up to date, as the D610 only records a maximum of 30 full frames per second at full HD resolution. With the classic virtues, however, the camera does everything right. It offers an excellent optical viewfinder, reacts to input in a flash and adapts to the photographer’s needs like a tailor-made suit. The set lens cannot keep up with all the good features of the camera. It registers strongly and suffers from a pronounced loss of resolution towards the edges of the image. Compared to its predecessor, the D610 offers a somewhat faster continuous shooting mode, the option of quiet continuous shooting and a newly tuned white balance for artificial light. These are too weak arguments for the owner of a D600 to replace it with the new D610.

Fact sheet

Fact sheet
Manufacturer Nikon
Model D600
Price approx. 2.500 EUR*
Sensor Resolution 24.3 megapixels
Max. Image resolution 6.016 x 4.016
(aspect ratio) (3:2)
Lens AF-S Nikkor 24-85 mm 1:3.5-4.5G ED VR
Filter threads 72 mm
Viewfinder Pentaprism
Field of vision 100 %
Enlargement 0,7-fold
Diopter compensation -3 to +1 dpt.
LCD monitor 3,2″
Disbandment 921.000
rotatable
swivelling
as seeker yes
Video output
AV and HDMI
(per PAL/NTSC)
as seeker yes
Program automation yes
Aperture priority yes
Aperture priority yes
manual exposure yes
BULB long-term exposure yes
Motive programmes
Portrait yes
Children/Babies yes
Countryside yes
Macro yes
Sports/Action yes
more 14
Exposure metering Multi-field, Centre-weighted Integral, Spot
Flash yes
Flash connection ISO system flash shoe
Remote release Cable, Infrared
Interval shooting
Storage medium 2x SD/SDHC/SDXC
Video mode
Size MOV
Codec H.264/AVC
Resolution (max.) 1.920 x 1.080
Frame rate (max.) 50i
Sensitivity
automatic ISO 100-25.600 (upper limit adjustable)
manually ISO 50-25.600
White balance
Automatic yes
Sun yes
Clouds yes
Fluorescent lamp yes
Light bulb yes
Other Shadows, manual color temperature selection
Manual yes
Autofocus
Number of measuring fields 39
AF auxiliary light white LED
Speed approx. 0.3 s
Languages German
more 27
One-hand operation
(zoom and shutter release)
Weight
(Ready)
approx. 772 g (housing only
)approx. 1,362 g (with lens*)
Zoom
Zoom adjustment at lens
Triggering during
.Save as possible.
yes
Battery life approx. 900 images (according to CIPA)
– = “not applicable” or “not available
“* with lens AF-S Nikkor 24-85 mm 1:3.5-4.5G ED VR

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Robust housing with good ergonomics
  • Very wide range of equipment including practical automatic systems
  • Automatic white balance with harmonious colors in artificial light
  • Excellent image quality, even at high ISO numbers

Cons

  • Full HD video with 30p or 50i only
  • Slow and unsafe Live View AF
  • AF fields too close to the center of the image

Nikon D610 Specifications

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 35mm 36.0 x 24.0 mm (crop factor 1.0
)24.7 megapixels (physical) and 24.3 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 6,0 µm
Photo resolution
6.016 x 4.016 pixels (3:2)
4.512 x 3.008 pixels (3:2)
3.008 x 2.008 pixels (3:2)
Picture formats JPG, RAW, TIF, TIF compressed
Color depth 42 bits (14 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard
Video resolution
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 30 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 30 p
Video format
MOV (Codec H.264)

Lens

Lens mount
Nikon F

Focusing

Autofocus mode Phase comparison autofocus with 9 cross sensors, autofocus working range from -1 EV to 19 EV
Autofocus Functions Single autofocus, Continuous autofocus, Tracking autofocus, Manual, AFL function, AF Assist Light
Focus control Depth of field control, dimming button

Viewfinder and Monitor

Reflex viewfinder Reflex viewfinder (prism viewfinder) (100 % image coverage), 21 mm eye relief, diopter compensation (-3.0 to +1.0 dpt), replaceable focusing screens
Monitor 3.2″ (8.0 cm) TFT LCD monitor with 921,000 pixels, viewing angle 170°, anti-glare, brightness adjustable
Info display additional info display (top)

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement over 2,016 fields, spot measurement
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 30 s (automatic
)1/4,000 to 30 s (manual)
Bulb function
Exposure control Program automatic, Aperture automatic, Time automatic, Manual
Bracketing function Step size from 1/3 to 3 EV, HDR function
Exposure compensation -5.0 to +5.0 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 100 to ISO 6,400 (automatic
)ISO 50 to ISO 25,600 (manual)
Remote access Remote release, cable release
Motives Flowers, twilight, indoor photo, candlelight, children, landscape, night portrait, close-up, portrait, sunset, sports, beach/snow, animals, 3 more motif programs
Picture effects brilliant, HDR effects, high key, landscape, low key, monochrome, neutral, portrait, brilliant, landscape (all programs modifiable), monochrome, neutral, portrait, standard
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sun, White balance bracket, Fine tuning, Shadow, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 7 presets, Incandescent lamp with 1 presets, From 2,500 to 10,000 K, Manual 4 memory locations
Color space Adobe RGB, sRGB
Continuous shooting 6.0 frames/s at highest resolution, silent mode with maximum 3 frames per second
Self-timer Self-timer at intervals of 2 s, special features: or 10 s (optional)
Shooting functions Mirror lock-up, AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Flash built-in flash (hinged
)flash shoe: Nikon, standard center contact
Flash range Flash sync time 1/250 s
Flash number Guide number 12 (ISO 100)
Flash functions Auto, Fill-in flash, Flash on, Flash off, High speed sync, Slow sync, Flash on second shutter curtain, Red-eye reduction, Master function

Equipment

Image stabilizer no optical image stabilizer
Memory
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
second memory card slot
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
GPS function GPS external (wired or plug-on receiver)
Power supply Power supply connection
Power supply 1 x Nikon EN-EL15 (lithium ions (Li-Ion), 7.4 V, 1,030 mAh)
Playback Functions Crop Images, Rotate Images, Protect Images, Highlight / Shadow Warning, Playback Histogram, Playback Magnifier, Image Index, Zoom Out
Picture parameters Contrast
Special functions Electronic water level, Grid can be faded in, Orientation sensor, Live View
Ports Data interfaces: USBUSB type
:USB 2.0 High Speed
AV connectors AV output: HDMI output Micro (Type D
)Audio input: yes (3.5 mm jack (stereo with power supply))
Audio output: yes (3.5 mm jack (stereo, 3-pole))
Supported direct printing methods DPOF, PictBridge
Tripod socket 1/4″ in optical axis
Case Splash guard
Features and Miscellaneous Integrated sensor cleaning systemD-Lighting
for artificial brightening of dark image areasEXPEED-3 Image ProcessorLive-Viewwith contrast based AF on SensorAF-MotiverkennungWhite balance exposure series

2 to 3 imagesADL exposure series

of

three imagesFlash exposure series
2 to 3 imagesActive-D-Lighting
(five steps)

Size and weight

Dimensions W x H x D 141 x 113 x 82 mm
Weight 850 g (ready for operation)

Other

included accessories Nikon AN-DC10 Storage AccessoriesNikon
BF-1B (Housing Cover)
Nikon BM-12 (Monitor Cover)
Nikon BS-1 (Shoe Cover)Nikon

Capture NX SoftwareNikon
DK-17 (Eyepiece Protective Glass)
Nikon DK-21 (Eyecup)Nik

on

DK-5 (E
yepiece
Cover)Nik

on

EN-EL15 Special BatteryNikon
MH-25 Charger for Special BatteriesNikon
UC-E14 USB CableLCD Cover
BM-12Rubber Eyecup Cover

BS-125

Charger for Special BatteriesNikon
UC-E14 USB CableLCD Cover
BM-12Rubber Eyecup Cover

BS-1

Eyepiece End DK-17Rising StrapImage Editing Software

Nikon Picture ProjectImage Management Software
Nikon View Pro

optional accessory Nikon EH-5B Power Supply UnitNikon
EN-EL15 Special BatteryNikon
EP-5B Battery Compartment Adapter CableNikon
MB-D14 Rechargeable Battery / Battery Grip Removable Memory CardWirelessTransmitter WT-4

Firmware Updates for Nikon D610: Support for AF-P Lenses

The new firmware C1.12 for the D750 contains the above mentioned changes regarding focusing with AF-P lenses. Also fixed a bug where the camera would sometimes display the penultimate image instead of the last image during playback after shooting when the second card slot function was on reserve. Also, the automatic microphone level setting sometimes didn’t work properly.

The updates can be downloaded from the Nikon website and installed by the user according to the instructions there. If you don’t have the confidence to do this yourself, you can ask your dealer or the Nikon Service for help.

Nikon D610 Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 35mm 36.0 x 24.0 mm (crop factor 1.0
)24.7 megapixels (physical) and 24.3 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 6,0 µm
Photo resolution
6.016 x 4.016 pixels (3:2)
4.512 x 3.008 pixels (3:2)
3.008 x 2.008 pixels (3:2)
Picture formats JPG, RAW, TIF, TIF compressed
Colour depth 42 bits (14 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard
Video resolution
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 30 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 30 p
Video format
MOV (Codec H.264)

Lens

Lens mount
Nikon F

Focusing

Autofocus mode Phase comparison autofocus with 9 cross sensors, autofocus working range from -1 EV to 19 EV
Autofocus Functions Single autofocus, Continuous autofocus, Tracking autofocus, Manual, AFL function, AF Assist Light
Focus control Depth of field control, dimming button

Viewfinder and Monitor

Reflex viewfinder Reflex viewfinder (prism viewfinder) (100 % image coverage), 21 mm eye relief, diopter compensation (-3.0 to +1.0 dpt), replaceable focusing screens
Monitor 3.2″ (8.0 cm) TFT LCD monitor with 921,000 pixels, viewing angle 170°, anti-glare, brightness adjustable
Info display additional info display (top)

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement over 2,016 fields, spot measurement
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 30 s (automatic
)1/4,000 to 30 s (manual)
Bulb function
Exposure control Program automatic, Aperture automatic, Time automatic, Manual
Bracketing function Step size from 1/3 to 3 EV, HDR function
Exposure compensation -5.0 to +5.0 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 100 to ISO 6,400 (automatic
)ISO 50 to ISO 25,600 (manual)
Remote access Remote release, cable release
Motives Flowers, twilight, indoor photo, candlelight, children, landscape, night portrait, close-up, portrait, sunset, sports, beach/snow, animals, 3 more motif programs
Picture effects brilliant, HDR effects, high key, landscape, low key, monochrome, neutral, portrait, brilliant, landscape (all programs modifiable), monochrome, neutral, portrait, standard
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sun, White balance bracket, Fine tuning, Shadow, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 7 presets, Incandescent lamp with 1 presets, From 2,500 to 10,000 K, Manual 4 memory locations
Color space Adobe RGB, sRGB
Continuous shooting 6.0 frames/s at highest resolution, silent mode with maximum 3 frames per second
Self-timer Self-timer at intervals of 2 s, special features: or 10 s (optional)
Shooting functions Mirror lock-up, AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Lightning bolt built-in flash (hinged
)flash shoe: Nikon, standard center contact
Flash range Flash sync time 1/250 s
Flash number Guide number 12 (ISO 100)
Flash functions Auto, Fill-in flash, Flash on, Flash off, High speed sync, Slow sync, Flash on second shutter curtain, Red-eye reduction, Master function

Equipment and equipment

Image stabilizer no optical image stabilizer
Memory
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
second memory card slot
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
GPS function GPS external (wired or plug-on receiver)
Power supply Power supply connection
Power supply 1 x Nikon EN-EL15 (lithium ions (Li-Ion), 7.4 V, 1,030 mAh)
Playback Functions Crop Images, Rotate Images, Protect Images, Highlight / Shadow Warning, Playback Histogram, Playback Magnifier, Image Index, Zoom Out
Picture parameters Contrast
Special functions Electronic water level, Grid can be faded in, Orientation sensor, Live View
Ports Data interfaces: USBUSB type
:USB 2.0 High Speed
AV connectors AV output: HDMI output Micro (Type D
)Audio input: yes (3.5 mm jack (stereo with power supply))
Audio output: yes (3.5 mm jack (stereo, 3-pole))
Supported direct printing methods DPOF, PictBridge
Tripod socket 1/4″ in optical axis
Case Splash guard
Features and Miscellaneous Integrated sensor cleaning systemD-Lighting
for artificial brightening of dark image areasEXPEED-3 Image ProcessorLive-Viewwith contrast based AF on SensorAF-MotiverkennungWhite balance exposure series

2 to 3 imagesADL exposure series

of

three imagesFlash exposure series
2 to 3 imagesActive-D-Lighting
(five steps)

Size and weight

Dimensions W x H x D 141 x 113 x 82 mm
Weight 850 g (ready for operation)

Other

included accessories Nikon AN-DC10 Storage AccessoriesNikon
BF-1B (Housing Cover)
Nikon BM-12 (Monitor Cover)
Nikon BS-1 (Shoe Cover)Nikon

Capture NX SoftwareNikon
DK-17 (Eyepiece Protective Glass)
Nikon DK-21 (Eyecup)Nik

on

DK-5 (E
yepiece
Cover)Nik

on

EN-EL15 Special BatteryNikon
MH-25 Charger for Special BatteriesNikon
UC-E14 USB CableLCD Cover
BM-12Rubber Eyecup Cover

BS-125

Charger for Special BatteriesNikon
UC-E14 USB CableLCD Cover
BM-12Rubber Eyecup Cover

BS-1

Eyepiece End DK-17Rising StrapImage Editing Software

Nikon Picture ProjectImage Management Software
Nikon View Pro

optional accessory Nikon EH-5B Power Supply UnitNikon
EN-EL15 Special BatteryNikon
EP-5B Battery Compartment Adapter CableNikon
MB-D14 Rechargeable Battery / Battery Grip Removable Memory CardWirelessTransmitter WT-4
Peter Dench
Peter Dench
I am Peter Dench. Digital Photographer, born in London 1972, currently living in Deerfield, near Chicago. I have numerous photography expositions and also working in model photography. In this website, PhotoPoint, I usually review cameras provided by local dealers in Illinois and by the manufacturers. Sometimes I, Peter Dench, review lenses too, but only when I have a suitable camera for them. Please let me know in the comments if I can improve any of these articles.

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Latest Articles

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Panasonic Lumix FZ35 (FZ38) Review

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Nikon D4 Review

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Canon Rebel SL3 Review (EOS 250D)

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Sony Alpha 6100 Review

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Sony Alpha 6600 Review

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Sony a37 Review

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Nikon Z50 Review

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Canon EOS M6 Mark II Review

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Canon EOS M200 Review

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Olympus EM5 Mark III Review

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Fujifilm FinePix X10 Review

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Olympus E10 Review

Olympus E10 Review Olympus is making public the new flagship among its digital cameras, which is the Olympus E10, revealing...

Sony Cybershot HX95 And HX99 Reviews

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Nikon Coolpix A Review

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Panasonic Lumix G95 (Lumix G90-G91) Review

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Samsung NX1000 Review

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Panasonic Lumix ZS7 (TZ10) Review

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Canon PowerShot S110 Review

Canon PowerShot S110 Review The Canon PowerShot S110 is a WLAN camera with manual control and touch display optically zooms...

Panasonic Lumix FZ35 (FZ38) Review

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