CAMERAS Sony Cybershot HX95 And HX99 Reviews

Sony Cybershot HX95 And HX99 Reviews

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Sony Cybershot HX95 And HX99 Reviews

Home CAMERAS Sony Cybershot HX95 And HX99 Reviews

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX95 and HX99 with 24-720mm zoom: Two Similar Compact Travel Cameras

With the two models Cybershot DSC-HX95 and HX99, Sony‘s travel zoom cameras finally arrive in the 4K age. Moreover, according to Sony, these are the most compact travel zoom cameras on the market.

They accommodate an optical 30x zoom, which covers a focal length range from 24 to 720 millimeters including optical image stabilization. Sony also promises rapid autofocus and long continuous shooting thanks to a front-end BSI.

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX95 and HX99 Pros And Cons

Pros

  • Small elegant housing
  • Extensive equipment incl. electronic viewfinder
  • 30x zoom lens
  • Large buffer memory for serial images

Cons

  • Weak resolution in the tele range
  • Low memory speed for continuous shooting
  • Touch screen use not possible everywhere
  • Open HDMI interface on the ground

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The Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 travel zoom cameras now master 4K video capture with full sensor readout, capturing ten consecutive images per second for over 150 consecutive photos. [Photo: Sony]

Sony introduced the Cybershot HX95 and HX99 camera siblings, which look identical. Nevertheless, there are differences in the equipment and features included. We have tested the HX99, the “larger” of the siblings. We’ll determine whether Sony has the combination of small sensor, high resolution and long focal length under control or not.

Technically, the Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 are almost identical, so we’ll only go into the differences briefly: In contrast to the HX95, the 20 dollars more expensive HX99 has a touchscreen that is suitable for focusing on a scene detail as well as for triggering. Even when looking through the viewfinder, the autofocus field can be shifted with a fingertip. In addition, unlike the HX95, the HX99 is capable of focus peaking to assist with manual focusing.

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The clearly structured case of the Sony Cybershot HX99 presents itself small and angular. [Photo: Sony]

At the heart of the new travel zoom cameras is the 30x optical zoom with Zeiss T* label, which covers a frame-equivalent focal length range from 24 to 720 millimeters. It has an optical image stabilizer, but with F3.5 to F6.4, it is not particularly bright – typical for this type of camera.

To this end, Sony prides itself on having the most compact travel zoom cameras of their kind in its range, measuring around 102 x 58 x 36 millimeters. The weight is just over 240 grams when it is prepared and ready for use.

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The Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 offer not only a 7.5 cm screen but also a pop-up OLED viewfinder. [Photo: Sony]

The resolution of the small 1/2.3″ BSI CMOS sensor is a good 18 megapixels. Thanks to the front-end BSI, which has a large buffer memory and additional data processing capacity to support the actual Bionz X image processor, the Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 can record up to 155 consecutive images at a brisk ten frames per second.

The autofocus should be in place within a record-breaking 0.09 seconds. Video recordings also benefit from the concentrated computing power. For 4K images (3,840 x 2,160 pixels), the entire sensor is read out, which should result in detailed images with less image interference.

The frame rate is either 24, 25 or 30 frames per second. In order to capture the high quality on the memory card as well, the recording is done at 100 Mbps in XAVC-S format.

With Full HD resolution, the frame rate increases to up to 60 frames per second, and slow-motion shots are even possible at up to 120 frames per second.

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The Sony Cybershot HX99 is one of the most compact 30x zoom cameras. [Photo: Sony]

On the back is a 7.5-centimeter screen with a resolution of almost 922,000 pixels. It can be folded upwards by 180 degrees, which simplifies ground-level and selfie shots.

In addition, the Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 also focus specifically on the eyes, which is particularly practical for portraits. In addition to the screen, the two travel zoomers have a small pop-up viewfinder. This works with an OLED with a resolution of almost 640,000 pixels. It’s a bit coarse pixelated, but better than nothing, after all, no other camera of this size offers a viewfinder.

sony cybershot

The image-stabilized 30x zoom of the Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 covers a frame-equivalent focal length range of 24 to 720mm and folds up in a less than 36mm slim body. [Photo: Sony]

Sony wants to have improved the operating concept not only with a more concise grip but also with the new “My menu”, in which up to 30 functions can be saved.

Also new is the ability to save photos in raw data format to the SD/SDHC/SDXC card. In contrast to the HX90, there is no longer a version with GPS (HX90V), but the Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 are equipped with WLAN and Bluetooth, which allows permanent transmission of location information from the smartphone to the camera. Of course, pictures can also be sent in another direction or the camera can be operated remotely via an app from the smartphone.

 

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The rear screen of the Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 can be folded up 180 degrees for selfies. Thanks to the touch screen, the HX99 can even take a photo with a fingertip. [Photo: Sony]

Ergonomics And Workmanship

The Sony Cybershot HX99, HX99 for short, is a remarkably small camera. With dimensions of only 102 x 58 x 36 millimeters, it fits in almost any jacket pocket, and with a weight of 242 grams including the battery it really isn’t that much.

Talking about the battery: this is the NP-BX1, with which the camera should have a range of 390 pictures. This was determined by Sony according to the CIPA test procedure. The battery is charged inside the camera using the supplied USB charger or an optional battery charger. An LED indicates whether the camera is charging the battery after a USB cable is plugged in. However, this is so badly obstructed that the photographer has to take a closer look to see if it is lit or not.

The plastic housing with metal front shell is angular, cleanly processed and tidy, also the lens. With small cameras, the “grip” is often not optimal, and the HX99 is no exception. Although the rather angular little handle on the front helps, it is not enough to give a real “sticky feeling”.

The controls are well distributed, but the size or rather small size of the camera is noticeable here as well. For example, the multi-function dial and speed dial buttons are covered by the thumb needed to hold the camera when taking pictures. To make adjustments, the photographer has to push the thumb down and this can be quite cramped, depending on the size of the hands.

A one-handed navigation of the menus in the camera is therefore rather flat. However, in this camera size, it is also very difficult to implement a lavishly large operating concept.

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On the back of the Sony Cybershot HX99, the moving touchscreen dominates. The function block on the right-hand side is rather crowded. [Photo: Sony]

The lens dominates the front of the camera and for good reason. The 4.25 to 118 mm lens with a speed of F3.5 to F6.4 covers the image range of a 35 mm lens with 24 to 720 millimeters, i.e. it is a 30x zoom.

Because of the long focal length, the HX99 has an optical image stabilizer to compensate for camera shake. The zoom can also be operated at two speeds and a step-by-step zoom using the lens ring can also be activated via a menu option.

This can also be assigned to all kinds of other functions. However, it is particularly well suited for manual focusing and, of course, aperture setting. In combination with the multi-function rotary wheel on the back, the camera can be adjusted excellently even outside of the program automatically.

Like its sister model, the HX95, the HX99 has a 3″ TFT LC display that can be folded up 180 degrees, but the touch function is reserved for the HX99. However, this is not all-encompassing even with the HX99.

Although the photographer can make all kinds of adjustments to the touchscreen function, these only involve moving the focus point or triggering the shutter release with a fingertip on the display.

Menu navigation, on the other hand, must be carried out using the multifunction rotary wheel.

Despite the small size of the HX99, like the HX95, it has a retractable viewfinder. This is however quite small and fiddly. With 638,400 pixels, it is not particularly high-resolution, and the viewfinder image appears quite small, which puts the low resolution somewhat into perspective. A dioptre compensation is available despite the small size.

The Sony menu is packed with setting options that allow you to customize camera behavior, image processing, and operation to your own taste. The photographer can also put together his or her own individual menu, which is easy to access.

Navigation is smooth with the multi-function rotary wheel, and you need little training to navigate through the menus quickly and safely.

In terms of interfaces, the HX99 offers the photographer a micro USB and HDMI micro interface. While the USB port is covered by a plastic cap, the HDMI port on the bottom of the camera is open. Whether this is a good idea for a travel camera is something everyone has to decide for themselves. In addition, a WLAN and Bluetooth interface and NFC are also available. But more about that later.

Sony didn’t bother with the 1/4 inch tripod thread. The thread is located outside the optical axis directly on the battery door. So if a quick-release plate is mounted, it must always be removed when the battery or memory card is to be removed. The camera uses a micro SD, SDHC or SDXC card as memory.

A Memorystick Micro can also be used. It wouldn’t be a Sony camera if the proprietary memory card system from Sony wasn’t used as well.

Equipment And Features

The Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99 show some differences in features. With the HX95, for example, the photographer has to do without an optional step zoom or fast zoom option, as well as focus peaking and the zebra function.

sony cybershot

On the left side of the Sony DSC-HX99, you can see the NFC logo used for wireless functionality. [Photo: Sony]

The Cyber-shot DSC-HX99 has a manual mode, aperture priority, program and scene modes. To be precise, the HX99 has two automatic shooting modes. The “Intelligent Auto” recognizes the subject situation and takes over the adjustment of the shooting settings and the image processor.

The “superior automatic” function “automatically takes beautiful pictures while reducing blur and noise”, the camera explains this function in a very cryptic way. In this mode, the camera can take a series of images of darker, low-contrast subjects and then stitch them together to create a high-contrast image. This worked quite well, but even this function cannot work miracles.

Other operating modes include a scene mode. In this mode, the photographer selects the appropriate subject program from a menu with the aid of the lens ring. A total of twelve programs are available. Among them are programs for sunsets, macros, portraits and more.

The mode dial also features a convenient panorama function. It is always impressive how easy it is to create panoramas with this function. Simply hold down the shutter release button and pan the camera in the direction shown. The camera then does the rest and assembles the images together.

Right next to the panorama function is the video function. We will come back to these a little later. The final step on the mode dial is the two “custom” programs. These two memory locations are intended for individual camera settings that can be freely defined by the photographer.

The autofocus system of the Cyber-shot has a pre-autofocus. This helps to focus on all focal length ranges and is designed to minimize focus times. For our test with the test software we normally use, however, such auxiliary functions are deactivated so that the pure “real” focusing time can be determined.

At wide-angle, the Sony Cybershot HX99 can focus and release in 0.29 seconds. In the tele range this time increases to 0.4 seconds. The values could be faster, but are not bad in themselves. With the pure shutter release delay after pre-focusing, the Sony is very fast with 0.03 seconds in the wide-angle and telephoto range.

Autofocus functions range from face detection and recognition to tracking autofocus, manual focus and “direct manual focus” (DMF). In this mode, the photographer can change the focus with the lens ring at any time.

A variable size magnifying glass and, only on the HX99, a focus peaking function are available to assist manual focusing. The photographer can easily set the focus point using the touch screen. In addition, the photographer can rely on automatic focus area selection or choose the option that suits the situation from other settings.

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There is not much to see on the right side of the camera. Only the strap eyelet and the plastic cover of the USB port are located here. [Photo: Sony]

Somewhat hidden are the color options, i.e. the options that give the photographer the possibility to reproduce colors according to his wishes.

On the one hand, the color options can be stored in the already mentioned quick selection menu and on the other hand, the photographer can adjust the display in a way that more options are available. Once in this screen view, all you need to do is click on the function key and the menu on the right-hand side can be navigated. Effects such as Retro, Black and White, HDR, Colorkey and more are available.

Besides the already mentioned extending viewfinder on top of the camera, there is the flip-up flash, whose power is economical. Only with a guide number of about 5 (ISO 100 / 1 m) can the subject be brightened. Less economical, however, is the HX99’s continuous shooting function. Ten frames per second for JPG and about seven frames per second for raw shots are effortlessly handled by the camera.

Of the JPGs, 146 can be stored in sequence and 70 in raw mode, but unfortunately, the Sony HX99 has the same problem that many Sony cameras have in continuous shooting mode.

Thanks to the front-end LSI, the camera has a considerably large buffer memory. But if this is filled, the continuous shooting speed slows down to 2.8 frames per second for JPG and 2.1 frames per second for raw shots. If the photographer removes his or her finger from the shutter release during shooting, it takes the camera a while to write the buffer to the memory card, and the HX99 does that at a comfortable ~38 megabytes per second. For the photographer, this means a forced break of up to 40 seconds.

The video function offers a 4K resolution with 30 frames per second (3,840 x 2,160). However, this requires a UHS-I standard memory card in the camera that meets the U3 speed class.

If the card is slower, the photographer has no choice but to switch to Full-HD resolution (1,920 x 1,080) to reduce the data throughput a little, otherwise, the HX99 will refuse to record video. The range of functions for video recording is good for the camera class. In addition to the video resolution, the data rates can be selected, the internal microphone can be deactivated and the level can be adjusted in two steps. Only a microphone input is missing to make the video function completely “round”.

Away from the obvious functions, highlights such as bracketing are hidden in the selection menus during recording, which can be selected with a quick selection button or the recording menu. This includes different types of bracketing.

The conventional exposure series offers a maximum of nine images with up to 1.0 EV difference or even up to 3 EV exposure difference for a maximum of five images. White balance bracketing and dynamic range bracketing are also selectable.

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On the top of the camera, the gaps between the flash and the viewfinder of the Sony HX99 are clearly visible. To the right are the program dial, shutter release button, and zoom lever. [Photo: Sony]

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Under full zoom, the lens becomes much more massive than the Sony HX99 itself. [Photo: Sony]

The Sony Cybershot DSC-HX99 has WLAN and Bluetooth connectivity. The different connection types also have two different tasks, but both require the PlayMemories Mobile app. These are available for free in the Google Play Store and on iTunes.

The installation of the software is done in no time. Then the camera can be connected to the smartphone. For this purpose, either the NFC interface is used or a QR code is filmed with the app and shown on the camera display.

The photographer can then use the WLAN connection to transfer photos and videos. Remote control with Live View can also be used. The settings options through the app are quite comprehensive. The Bluetooth connection is not quite as fast as the WLAN, but it is very economical. For this reason, this connection is used to write geodata from the smartphone into the metadata of the photos taken.

Image Quality Of The Sony Cybershot HX95 and HX99

The zoom lens only partially meets the expectations of the camera. Although the drop in sharpness from the center of the image to the edge of the frame is small at wide-angle and medium focal length, it is not so at telephoto, where the drop in sharpness is visible.

This is confirmed by the number of displayed line pairs lp/mm. While almost 47 lp/mm can be displayed in the center of the image at wide-angle, it is only 19 lp/mm at the maximum telephoto setting. With this result, the Sony HX99 has to admit defeat to the Canon SX740 HS, for example, which has a resolution of about 29 lp/mm at maximum telephoto. If the photographer closes the aperture, the imaging performance in all focal lengths also decreases due to diffraction.

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On the bottom of the Sony Cybershot HX99, you can see the open HDMI port, tripod socket, and battery door. [Photo: Sony]

The optical and electronic correction of the lens has been successful, it shows only minimal cushion distortion. Chromatic aberrations are partially visible in the telephoto range. Here the Sony HX99 and Canon SX740 HS are on the same level. Only the Panasonic ZS80 (TZ91 in Europe) has even less to struggle with this error.

The signal-to-noise ratio, which is important for image noise, describes the distance between the noise and the image signal. The closer the two are together, the more the image signal is overlaid by the interference signal. The acceptable limit is 35 dB. The Sony Cybershot HX99 makes no compromise here and starts pretty much at this limit at ISO 80, then holds this value until ISO 400 and then it goes down continuously.

Thus the camera is fully in the performance range of other travel zoom cameras. Fine details are easily displayed by the Sony up to ISO 400. Above ISO 800, fine details are eliminated from the image by noise reduction. As with other travel zoom cameras, the brightness noise is hardly a problem. The Sony Cybershot HX99 is no exception. While the brightness noise remains fine-grained and only slightly visible up to ISO 800, the color noise remains almost invisible overall ISO levels.

The camera changes colors only slightly. Only the areas around magenta and red-orange are reproduced slightly altered. The reason for this is the default setting of the image processor, which tries to make some color areas more pleasing to the viewer.

The actual color depth is in the range of ISO 80 to 400 with two to four million colors on a good level, even at ISO 1,600 Sony still differentiates well over one million color nuances.

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The battery compartment of the Sony Cybershot HX99 is a “shared apartment” of Li-Ion battery and MicroSD memory card or MemoryStick Micro. [Photo: Sony]

With about ten f-stops input dynamic range at ISO 80 to 200, the camera is quite good, even though it lags behind the input dynamic range of other travel zoom cameras, which reach over eleven f-stops. This dynamic decreases continuously with increasing sensitivity.

The tuning of the tonal value transmission is raised in the mid-tones, as one would expect from shoot-to-print cameras. The output tonal value transfer is acceptable up to ISO 1,600, but only just good at ISO 200. The Sony Cybershot HX99 does not place itself at the top of the “travel zoom league” in this area either.

Conclusion: Are The Sony Cybershot HX99 and HX95 Worth It?

At first glance, the Sony Cybershot HX99 is the ideal pocket camera with a large zoom. The operation is also easy, even if it’s a pity that the touchscreen can’t be used for menu navigation.

The range of functions is extensive and the photographer can let his creative imagination run wild or be actively supported by the automatic functions. The camera’s connectivity is easy to set up and offers a lot of comfort and room for experiments.

The crux is, as with all travel zoom cameras, the small image sensor. The HX99 doesn’t perform miracles either, and you have to wonder if the long final focal length is worth accepting the shortcomings of the image quality in telephoto.

Nevertheless, the image quality is good at wide-angle and in the medium focal length. In the end, the photographer must know his camera to balance the weaknesses with the strengths. The Sony Cybershot HX99 is not an outstanding travel-zoom camera, but it is also far from being a bad travel-zoom camera.

Profile Of The Sony Cybershot HX95

Profile
Manufacturer Sony
Model DSC-HX95 or Sony Cybershot HX95
Sensor CMOS 1/2.3″ 6.2 x 4.6 mm (crop factor 5.6) 18.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixelpitch 1.3 µm
Resolution (max.) 4.896 x 3.672 (4:3)
Video (max.) 3.840 x 2,160 30p
Lens F3.5-6.3/24-720mm
Filter thread No filter thread installed
Video finder EVF, 100% field coverage, 638,400 pixels resolution, 2.80x magnification (sensor-related), 0.50x magnification (KB equivalent), diopter compensation (-4.0 to 3.0 dpt)
Monitor 3.0″ (7.5 cm)
Resolution 921.000 pixels
tiltable yes
rotatable
swiveling
Touchscreen
AV connector HDMI output Micro (Type D)
Fully automatic yes
Scene mode automatic yes
Scene mode programs 12
Automatic programming yes
Program shift yes
Automatic aperture control yes
Automatic timer yes
Manually yes
Bulb Long Term Exposure
HDR function yes
Panorama function yes, panoramic view
Exposure metering Multi-field, centre-weighted Integral, Spot
fastest shutter speed 1/2.000 s
Flash installed
Synchronous time 1/2.000 s
Flash connection
WLAN yes
NFC yes
GPS external, permanent smartphone connection
Remote release yes, remote control via smartphone/tablet
Interval recording
Storage medium
Memory Stick (Micro, Micro Mark II)
Micro SD (SDXC, SDHC, UHS-I)
SD
Sensitivity
automatically ISO 80-3,200
manually ISO 80-6.400
White balance
automatically yes
manual measuring yes
Kelvin input
Fine correction yes
Autofocus yes
Number of measuring fields
Speed 0.29 to 0.40 s
AF auxiliary light LED
Dimensions (WxHxD) 102 x 58 x 36 mm
Weight (ready for operation) 243 g
Tripod thread off optical axis
Zoom
Zoom adjustment Lens ring (motorized), ring rocker (motorized)
Battery life not specified
– = “not applicable” or “not available

 

Profile Of The Sony Cybershot HX99

Profile
Manufacturer Sony
Model DSC-HX99 or Sony Cybershot HX99
Sensor CMOS 1/2.3″ 6.2 x 4.6 mm (crop factor 5.6) 18.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixelpitch 1.3 µm
Resolution (max.) 4.896 x 3.672 (4:3)
Video (max.) 3.840 x 2,160 30p
Lens F3.5-6.3/24-720mm
Filter thread No filter thread installed
Video finder EVF, 100% field coverage, 638,400 pixels resolution, 2.80x magnification (sensor-related), 0.50x magnification (KB equivalent), diopter compensation (-4.0 to 3.0 dpt)
Display 3.0″ (7.5 cm)
Resolution 921.000 pixels
tiltable yes
rotatable
swiveling
Touchscreen yes
AV connector HDMI output Micro (Type D)
Fully automatic yes
Scene mode automatic yes
Scene mode programs 12
Automatic programming yes
Program shift yes
Automatic aperture control yes
Automatic timer yes
Manually yes
Bulb Long Term Exposure
HDR function yes
Panorama function yes, panoramic view
Exposure metering Multi-field, centre-weighted Integral, Spot
fastest shutter speed 1/2.000 s
Flash installed
Synchronous time 1/2.000 s
Flash connection
WLAN yes
NFC yes
GPS external, permanent smartphone connection
Remote release yes, remote control via smartphone/tablet
Interval recording
Storage medium
Memory Stick (Micro, Micro Mark II)
Micro SD (SDXC, SDHC)
Sensitivity
automatically ISO 80-3,200
manually ISO 80-6.400
White balance
automatically yes
manual measuring yes
Kelvin input
Fine correction yes
Autofocus yes
Number of measuring fields
Speed 0.23 to 0.40 s
AF auxiliary light LED
Dimensions (WxHxD) 102 x 58 x 36 mm
Weight (ready for operation) 242 g
Tripod thread off optical axis
Zoom
Zoom adjustment Lens ring (motorized), ring rocker (motorized)
Battery life 390 recordings according to CIPA standard
– = “not applicable” or “not available

Brief assessment Of The Sony Cybershot HX95 And HX99

Pros

  • Small elegant housing
  • Extensive equipment incl. electronic viewfinder
  • 30x zoom lens
  • Large buffer memory for serial images

Cons

  • Weak resolution in the tele range
  • Low memory speed for continuous shooting
  • Touch screen use not possible everywhere
  • Open HDMI interface on the ground

Sony DSC-HX95 Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 1/2.3″ 6.2 x 4.6 mm (crop factor 5.6) 18.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixelpitch 1.3 µm
Photo resolution
4.896 x 3.672 pixels (4:3)
4.896 x 3.264 pixels (3:2)
4.896 x 2.752 pixels (16:9)
3.664 x 3.664 pixels (1:1)
3.648 x 2.736 pixels (4:3)
3.648 x 2.432 pixels (3:2)
3.648 x 2.056 pixels (16:9)
2.736 x 2.736 pixels (1:1)
2.592 x 1.944 pixels (4:3)
2.592 x 1.728 pixels (3:2)
1.920 x 1.920 pixels (1:1)
1.920 x 1.080 pixels (16:9)
640 x 480 pixels (4:3)
Image formats JPG, RAW
Color depth 24 bits (8 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard (version 2)
Video resolution
3.840 x 2.160 (16:9) 30 p
3.840 x 2.160 (16:9) 25 p
3.840 x 2.160 (16:9) 24 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 120 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 100 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 60 i
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 60 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 i
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 30 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 25 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 24 p
Video format
MPG4 [codec MPEG-4]
AVCHD (Codec H.264)
XAVC S

Lens

Focal length 24 to 720 mm (35mm equivalent) 30x zoom4
.25 to 118 mm (physical) digital zoom 4x
Sharpness range 5 cm to infinity (wide angle) 250 cm to infinity (telephoto)
Aperture F3.5 to F8 (wide angle) F6.3 to F8 (telephoto)
Autofocus yes
Autofocus mode Contrast Autofocus
Autofocus functions Single AF, Continuous AF, Tracking AF, Manual, AFL Function, AF Assist Light (LED)
Filter thread No filter thread

Viewfinder and monitor

Monitor 3.0″ (7.5 cm) TFT LCD monitor with 921,000 pixels, viewing angle 180°, non-reflective, brightness adjustable, tilts up 180
Video finder Video viewfinder (100 % field coverage) with 638,400 pixels, magnification factor 2.80x (0.50x KB equivalent), dioptre compensation (-4.0 to 3.0 dpt)

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement, spot measurement
Exposure times 1/2,000 to 4 s (Automatic
)1/2,000 to 30 s (Manual)
Exposure control Fully Automatic, Program Automatic (with Program Shift), Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual, Motif Automatic
Exposure bracketing function HDR function
Exposure Compensation -3.0 to +3.0 EV with step size of 1/3 EV
Photosensitivity ISO 80 to ISO 3,200 (automatic
)ISO 80 to ISO 6,400 (manual)
Remote access Remote control via Smartphone/Tablet
Scene modes Twilight, backlight, night scene, portrait, sports/action, beach/snow, animals, 5 additional scene mode programs
Picture effects HDR effects, miniature effect, toy camera, soft focus, color key, high contrast (black and white), illustration, partial color (red, green, blue, yellow), pop color, soft high key, toy camera, water colors
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sunny, White balance bracket, Fine tuning, Shadow, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 2 presets, Tungsten light, Manual 3 memories
Color space sRGB
Continuous shooting Continuous shooting function max. 10 fps at highest resolution and max. 10 stored photos
Self-timer Self-timer with interval of 2 s, special features: or 5, 2 seconds; additional 3-fold self-timer
Recording functions AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Flash built-in flash (hinged)
Flash range 0.3 to 5.4 m at wide angle 2.5 to 3.0 m at telephotoFlash range
at ISO autoFlash number 5 (ISO 100) – Flash sync speed 1/2,000 s
Flash code
Guide number 5 (ISO 100)
Flash functions Auto, fill-flash, flash on, flash off, slow sync, flash on second shutter curtain, red-eye reduction, flash exposure compensation from -3.0EV to +3.0EV

Equipment And Features

Image stabilizer electronic image stabilizer, lens shift (optical)
Memory
Memory Stick (Micro, Micro Mark II)
Micro SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS-I)
SD
Panorama Sweeping panorama
12.416 x 1.856 pixels
5.536 x 2.160 pixels
8.192 x 1.856 pixels
3.872 x 2.160 pixels
GPS function GPS external (permanent smartphone connection)
Power supply unit Power supply connectionUSB continuous power supplyUSB charging function
Power supply 1 x Sony NP-BX1 (lithium-ion (Li-Ion), 3.6 V, 1,240 mAh) 370 images according to CIPA standard
Playback functions Red eye retouching, cropping, image rotation, image protection, highlight / shadow warning, playback histogram, playback magnifier, image index, slide show function with music
Face recognition Face recognition, smile recognition
Image parameters Sharpness, contrast, color saturation, noise reduction
Grille can be faded in during recording yes
Special functions Electronic spirit level, Orientation sensor, Zebra function, Live View, User profiles with 2 user profiles
Connections Data interfaces: Bluetooth, USBUSB type
: USB 2.0 High SpeedWLAN
: available (Type: B, G, N)
NFC: availableAudio output
: noAudio input
: noVideo output
: yes (HDMI output Micro (Type D))
Supported direct printing methods PictBridge
Tripod thread 1/4″ not in optical axis
Special features and miscellaneous BIONZ-X Image ProcessorBeauty Effect

(HD)SmartZoom Digital Zoom (magnification factor depends on resolution setting)
Dynamic Range Adjustment DRO (1-5 steps)
Auto Bracketing
44-scene

DR

Shooting
(Photo)
33-scene Auto Shooting (Video)
ISO Sensitivity Video (80-3,200)
Video Effects Retro, Soft High Key, Partial Color, High Contrast MonoMicrophone Level
Flip-up
Viewfinder

Size and weight

Weight 243 g (ready for operation)
Dimensions W x H x D 102 x 58 x 36 mm

Miscellaneous

standard accessory Sony AC-UB10C Charger for Special BatteriesSony
AC-UB10D Charger for Special BatteriesSony
NP-BX1 Special BatteriesAV-USB Combi CableHDMI AdapterRiser
additional accessories Sony VCT-SGR1 (handle)
USB
USB 2.0 (micro-USB)

Sony Cybershot HX99 Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 1/2.3″ 6.2 x 4.6 mm (crop factor 5.6) 18.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixelpitch 1.3 µm
Photo resolution
4.896 x 3.672 pixels (4:3)
4.896 x 3.264 pixels (3:2)
4.896 x 2.752 pixels (16:9)
3.664 x 3.664 pixels (1:1)
3.648 x 2.736 pixels (4:3)
3.648 x 2.432 pixels (3:2)
3.648 x 2.056 pixels (16:9)
2.736 x 2.736 pixels (1:1)
2.592 x 1.944 pixels (4:3)
2.592 x 1.728 pixels (3:2)
1.920 x 1.920 pixels (1:1)
1.920 x 1.080 pixels (16:9)
640 x 480 pixels (4:3)
Image formats JPG, RAW
Color depth 24 bits (8 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard (version 2)
Video resolution
3.840 x 2.160 (16:9) 30 p
3.840 x 2.160 (16:9) 25 p
3.840 x 2.160 (16:9) 24 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 120 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 100 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 60 i
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 60 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 i
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 30 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 25 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 24 p
Video format
MPG4 [codec MPEG-4]
AVCHD (Codec H.264)
XAVC S

Lens

Focal length 24 to 720 mm (35mm equivalent) 30x zoom4
.25 to 118 mm (physical)
digital zoom 4x
Sharpness range 5 cm to infinity (wide angle) 250 cm to infinity (telephoto)
Aperture F3.5 to F8 (wide angle) F6.3 to F8 (telephoto)
Autofocus yes
Autofocus mode Contrast Autofocus
Autofocus functions Single AF, Continuous AF, Tracking AF, Manual, AFL function, AF Assist Light (LED), Focus Peaking
Filter thread No filter thread

Viewfinder and Display

Monitor 3.0″ (7.5 cm) TFT LCD monitor with 921,000 pixels, viewing angle 180°, touch screen, non-reflective, brightness adjustable, tilts 180° up to 0° down
Video finder Video viewfinder (100 % field coverage) with 638,400 pixels, magnification factor 2.80x (0.50x KB equivalent), dioptre compensation (-4.0 to 3.0 dpt)

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement, spot measurement
Exposure times 1/2,000 to 4 s (Automatic) 1/2,000 to 30 s (Manual)
Exposure control Fully Automatic, Program Automatic (with Program Shift), Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual, Scene Automatic
Exposure bracketing function HDR function
Exposure Compensation -3.0 to +3.0 EV with step size of 1/3 EV
Photosensitivity ISO 80 to ISO 3,200 (automatic) ISO 80 to ISO 6,400 (manual)
Remote access Remote control via smartphone/tablet
Scene modes Twilight, backlight, night scene, portrait, sports/action, beach/snow, animals, 5 additional scene mode programs
Picture effects HDR effects, miniature effect, toy camera, soft focus, color key, high contrast (black and white), illustration, partial color (red, green, blue, yellow), pop color, soft high key, toy camera, water colors
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sunny, White balance bracket, Fine tuning, Shadow, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 2 presets, Tungsten light, Manual 3 memories
Color space sRGB
Continuous shooting Continuous shooting function max. 10 fps at highest resolution and max. 10 stored photos
Self-timer Self-timer with interval of 2 s, special features: or 5, 2 seconds; additional 3-fold self-timer
Recording functions AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Flash built-in flash (hinged)
Flash range 0.3 to 5.4 m at wide angle2
.5 to 3.0 m at tele flash sync speed
1/2,000 s
Flash functions Auto, fill-flash, flash on, flash off, slow sync, flash on second shutter curtain, red-eye reduction, flash exposure compensation from 3.0 EV to +-3.0 EV

Equipment And Features

Image stabilizer electronic image stabilizer, lens shift (optical)
Memory
Memory Stick (Micro, Micro Mark II)
Micro SD (SDHC, SDXC)
Panorama Sweeping panorama
12.416 x 1.856 pixels
5.536 x 2.160 pixels
8.192 x 1.856 pixels
3.872 x 2.160 pixels
GPS function GPS external (permanent smartphone connection)
Microphone Stereo
Power supply unit Power supply connectionUSB continuous power supplyUSB charging function
Power supply 1 x Sony NP-BX1 (lithium-ion (Li-Ion), 3.6 V, 1,240 mAh) 370 images according to CIPA standard
Playback functions Red eye retouching, cropping, image protection, highlight / shadow warning, playback histogram, playback magnifier, image index, slide show function with music
Face recognition Face recognition, smile recognition
Image parameters Sharpness, contrast, color saturation, noise reduction
Grille can be faded in during recording yes
Special functions Electronic spirit level, Orientation sensor, Zebra function, Live View, User profiles with 2 user profiles
Connections Data interfaces: Bluetooth, USBUSB type
: USB 2.0 High SpeedWLAN
: available (Type: B, G, N)
NFC: availableAudio output
: noAudio input
: noVideo output
: yes (HDMI output Micro (Type D))
Supported direct printing methods PictBridge
Tripod thread 1/4″ not in optical axis
Special features and miscellaneous BIONZ-X Image ProcessorBeauty Effect

(HD)SmartZoom Digital Zoom (magnification factor depends on resolution setting)
Touch AF FunctionDynamic Range
Adjustment DRO (1-5 steps)

Auto

Bracketing
44-scene

DR

Shooting
(Photo)
33-scene Auto Scene
Sensitivity Video (80-3,200)
Video Effects Retro, Soft High Key, Partial Color, High Contrast MonoMicrophone Level

AdjustmentFlip-up Viewfinder

Size And Weight Of The Sony Cybershot HX99

Weight 242 g (ready for operation)
Dimensions W x H x D 102 x 58 x 36 mm

Miscellaneous

standard accessory Sony AC-UB10C Charger for Special BatteriesSony
AC-UB10D Charger for Special BatteriesSony
NP-BX1 Special BatteriesAV-USB Combi CableHDMI AdapterRiser
additional accessories Sony VCT-SGR1 (handle)
USB
USB 2.0 (micro-USB)

 

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Peter Dench
Peter Dench
I am Peter Dench. Digital Photographer, born in London 1972, currently living in Deerfield, near Chicago. I have numerous photography expositions and also working in model photography. In this website, PhotoPoint, I usually review cameras provided by local dealers in Illinois and by the manufacturers. Sometimes I, Peter Dench, review lenses too, but only when I have a suitable camera for them. Please let me know in the comments if I can improve any of these articles.

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