Panasonic LX 100 Review

The LX series already has a nine-year tradition at Panasonic. The latest LX100 model, however, is completely different from the previous LX models. The current model follows the trend of installing ever larger sensors in high-class compact cameras without sacrificing fast lenses. Panasonic uses a proven Micro Four Thirds sensor with a resolution of 16 megapixels, but for various reasons only uses a partial area with a maximum of 12.8 megapixels. In addition, the LX100 is packed with technical highlights such as 4K video function, high-resolution viewfinder and ultra-fast autofocus.

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Powerful lens with fast autofocus
  • Over-complete equipment with almost all chicanes
  • Very good operation thanks to many keys and wheels
  • High-quality processed housing
  • Very good image quality up to ISO 800, good at 1,600 and usable at 3,200

Cons

  • No locking of aperture ring and exposure time wheel in automatic position
  • Fixed screen without touch function
  • Lens with clearly decreasing resolution at the image edge

In our test, the Panasonic LX100 gets a point deduction for the edge sharpness, but it recovers it for the image quality at high ISO sensitivities. The equipment lacks such things as a folding monitor and touch screen, but both can fall into the “matter of taste” category, because a folding monitor always makes a camera a little bigger and the touch monitor is a divide anyway. The rest of the equipment is excellent, to which the numerous dedicated control elements contribute, as well as the 4K video resolution with 25 fps, which is unique in this camera class so far. Then there’s the HDMI live out and stereo microphone connection, which would be too much of a challenge for this camera class. That’s why we award the full points for the equipment. Image quality assessment is based on compact cameras, of which the LX100 is one. It is at the top there and scratches the performance of the system cameras in terms of quality. The Panasonic Lumix LX100 has easily earned five out of five stars.

With the Lumix DMC-LX100, Panasonic presents a more than worthy successor to the LX7. The LX100 follows the motto “bigger is better” and uses a 17.3 x 13 millimeter Four-Thirds sensor with 16 megapixels. In addition, there is an F1.7-2.8 fast Leica lens with an equivalent focal length range of 24-75 millimeters. The typical multi-format function, in which the screen diagonal remains identical at 4:3, 3:2 and 19:9, is also part of the game again. With 2.76 million pixels, the electronic viewfinder is one of the highest resolution viewfinders on the market; the LX100 even records 4K video.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has an electronic viewfinder with 2.76 million pixels, the 921,000 pixels of the 7.5 cm screen, on the other hand, seem almost grumpy. [Photo: Panasonic]

Panasonic LX 100 Review

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 is equipped with a 17.3 x 13 mm 4/3″ sensor with 16 megapixels resolution, of which only a maximum of 12.8 megapixels are used. Thanks to the oversize sensor, the image angle remains the same at 4:3, 3:2 and 16:9.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 is also available in classic black.

The trend in high-end compact cameras has long since been towards large sensors, because new lens designs are becoming increasingly compact despite their high light intensity, and the image quality advantages of large sensors cannot be denied. So far, the 1″ sensor from Sony with 13.2 x 8.8 millimeters has dominated this segment. But with the LX100, Panasonic is for the first time using the 4/3″ sensor, well known from the Micro Four Thirds system, which offers twice the area of the 1″ sensor at 17.3 x 13 mm. The pixels become even larger and more light-sensitive because only 16 megapixels sit on the 4/3″ sensor instead of the 20 megapixels of the 1″ sensor. In addition, there is an F1.7-2.8 bright 24-75 millimeter zoom with Leica label and image stabilizer. The lens is relatively compact thanks to an elaborate construction, the LX100 is only 5.5 centimeters thick when switched off. The optical design consists of eleven lenses in eight groups, including five aspheric lenses with eight aspheric surfaces and two double aspheric ED lenses. The lens is centred extremely precisely during profiling and, for the first time in a Lumix camera, nine aperture blades are used for an almost circular aperture for a more pleasant bokeh.

However, Panasonic does not use the entire surface of the 4/3″ sensor, but realizes the unique multi-format concept with it: no matter if one photographs in the aspect ratio of 4:3, 3:2 or 16:9, the diagonal image angle always remains identical. Depending on the aspect ratio, the effective resolution is 12.5 to 11 megapixels. Only in the 1:1 aspect ratio, the image angle is trimmed to 28-88 millimeters corresponding to 35mm. The aspect ratio can be changed via a slide switch on the lens, but even all aspect ratios can be recorded simultaneously or selected in raw format during development on the PC.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

There has never been so much retro in the LX series before: The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has an aperture wheel, a time wheel and an exposure correction wheel. [Photo: Panasonic]

Panasonic LX 100 Review

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has an optical 3.1x zoom with image stabilizer, it covers 25-75 mm focal length corresponding to 35mm. [Photo: Panasonic]

The sensor is the same one used in the GH4. This means that the LX100 is also capable of 4K video recording. Here again, an advantage of the multi-format concept comes into play: with 4K video, the sensor pixels are used 1:1, which leads to a noticeable cropping of the image angle with the GH4. With the LX100, the step from photo 16:9 (4,480 x 2,520 pixels) to 4K video (3,820 x 2,160 pixels) is no longer so big, however, the small-image equivalent focal length shifts “only” to 26-81 millimetres. While 4K videos can be recorded at a maximum of 25 frames per second and stored on the SD card, Full HD also offers frame rates of 24p, 50p and 50i.

For the first time in the LX series, an electronic viewfinder is used, and Panasonic installs the best model available on the market. In principle it is the same viewfinder as the GH4. It resolves 2.76 million pixels (1,280 x 720 pixels) and covers 100 percent of the image field. The magnification factor is 0.7 for full format, so in principle you are looking at a cinema screen with HD resolution. The screen, on the other hand, uses standard fare: it is permanently installed, measures 7.5 centimeters diagonally and has a resolution of 921,000 pixels (640 x 480 pixels). The anti-reflective coating and the high viewing angle stability are already standard.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

In comparison to the mirrorless system camera Lumix DMC-GM5 also presented today, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 (right in the picture) is even slightly larger. Both have a 4/3″ sensor, but the LX100 has the faster lens.

But the LX100 breaks with even more of the conventional conventions of the LX series, because for the first time it relies on classic operation with a time wheel, aperture ring on the lens and exposure correction wheel. The LX100 is not only available in black, but also in silver with brown leather for a retro look. The high-quality processing with metal housing goes without saying. A second ring on the lens allows manual focusing. Automatic focusing is particularly fast thanks to DFD technology. With two differently focused images, the LX100 determines how far away the correct focus is from the current point at lightning speed, similar to a phase AF; the normal contrast autofocus provides the fine adjustment.

The three-digit number in the type designation indicates that the LX series (with previously one-digit numbers) will not simply be extended by a new chapter with the LX100, but that an additional, new book will be started. While the previous LX models were still equipped with a “medium-sized” 1/1.7-inch sensor, the LX100 now has a Four-Thirds sensor, which is very large for a compact camera, but whose area is only partially image effective, because the image circle of the lens is significantly smaller than with a (micro)Four-Thirds lens. Of course, this compromise is mainly due to the size of the zoom lens. If this would fully expose a Four-Thirds sensor, it would have to be much larger and would then (at least as a zoom with this zoom factor and this luminous intensity) no longer fit into the compact camera housing.

This makes the Four-Thirds sensor the oversized sensor typical of the LX series. The aspect ratio selected with the characteristic format switch on the lens, which is only available on Panasonic’s LX series, is therefore not simply a cropping of the maximum image size of the 4:3 sensor aspect ratio, as is usually the case. Instead, a 3:2 photo has more pixels in width than a 4:3 photo and a 16:9 photo is even wider. In our illustration we have shown the effectively used area. Although the sensor in the LX100 is only partially used, the increase in pixel size is considerable compared to earlier LX models: The pixel pitch, i.e. theoretically the pixel size (or at least the size of the individual microlens) of the LX100 is 4.2 micrometers, exactly twice that of the LX7, so the area is four times as large. With the larger sensor (and the larger lens), the weight of the camera increases by a third compared to the last LX models (compared to the first LX models, it is almost twice as heavy). The dimensions, on the other hand, practically do not increase. The minimally larger dimensions result exclusively from protruding parts.

By the way, according to Panasonic, the Lumix LX7 from 2012 remains in the program even further. This could make sense, because the LX100 has also increased its price by half compared to previous LX models and is now in a price range in which there are also good system cameras with interchangeable lenses.

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 is also available as Leica D-Lux (Type 109). Well processed and beautifully simple! The “Leica” is removed from this camera. [Photo: Leica]

Ergonomics and workmanship

The first time you unpack it, you are surprised: The LX100 actually looks like a Panasonic and yet again not. The plainly designed, high-quality processed metal dress with the protruding lens is typical for Panasonic and cannot deny its roots with the LX7. Only on the left side of the case the metal had to give way to a plastic cladding, because this is where the antennas for WLAN and NFC are located. But the aperture ring, the exposure time wheel and the exposure correction wheel don’t look like Panasonic at all, these classic control wheels could rather come from a Leica. In fact, Leica could have more fingers in the pie with the LX100 than usual. And this makes Leica’s LX100 derivative, which is called D-Lux (Type 109) and has an even simpler design, really look like a real Leica and use it that way. But the LX100 also looks good on these controls and appeals to photographers who prefer classic operation. Accordingly, there is no program selector wheel and also apparently no motif programs. However, Panasonic didn’t want to do without the fully automatic function entirely and has placed the iA button  on the top of the camera. Once you have “tinkered” with the camera, just press a button and the LX100 automatically adjusts everything – even the otherwise unselectable scene mode. The brick-like case essentially has three, perhaps four noteworthy “protrusions”: On the one hand, the small handle should be mentioned here, which is not particularly pronounced, but with its grained rubber coating provides more grip. A rubberized thumb recess on the back provides the appropriate support. A little cramped, the camera still lies in the hand plane typical for brick cameras without a pronounced handle. The biggest advantage on the front is the F1.7-2.8 fast 24-75mm zoom lens.

In addition to the aperture ring already mentioned, it also offers space for a fly-by-wire focus ring and the LX-typical aspect ratio selector. Like its predecessors, the LX100 is one of the very few cameras to offer the same diagonal viewing angle at 4:3, 3:2 and 16:9. This makes it particularly suitable for landscape photography in 16:9 format. Only at 1:1 the image is simply cropped sideways from the 4:3 format instead of taking full advantage of the height of the sensor. The focal length seems to shift in the direction of Tele, the 35mm equivalent is 28 to 88 millimetres.

The plainly designed, high-quality processed metal dress with the protruding lens is typical for Panasonic and cannot deny its roots with the LX7. Only on the left side of the case the metal had to give way to a plastic cladding, because this is where the antennas for WLAN and NFC are located. The aperture ring, the exposure time wheel as well as the exposure correction wheel could be from a Leica, it is even available as D-Lux (type 109). Accordingly, there is no program selector wheel and also apparently no motif programs. However, Panasonic didn’t want to do without the fully automatic function and has placed the iA button on the top of the camera. At the touch of a button, the LX100 automatically adjusts everything, including the scene mode.

  • Panasonic LX 100 Review

    The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has a fixed lens with a focal length of 10.9 to 34 millimeters, which covers a small picture equivalent focal length range of 24 to 75 millimeters.

The case does not have a particularly pronounced handle, but with its grained rubber coating it provides some support. A rubberized thumb recess on the back provides the appropriate support. Nevertheless, the camera is a bit cramped in the hand. The F1.7-2.8 fast 24-75mm zoom lens on the front offers a fly-by-wire focus ring as well as the typical LX aspect ratio selector with 1:1, 4:3, 3:2 and 16:9 in addition to the aperture ring, with the exception of 1:1 even with identical image diagonals thanks to the oversize sensor.

As an innovation in the LX class, a video viewfinder with a resolution of 2.76 million pixels can be found on the rear. Equipped with a diopter correction as well as a proximity sensor, the viewfinder, which magnifies 0.7 times in relation to 35mm, offers an excellent image. Only spectacle wearers do not have a complete overview due to the small exit pupil. The viewfinder image, as well as the monitor image, is displayed at 60 frames per second with no jerk or delay. The 3″ screen (7.5 centimetres diagonal) on the rear side has a resolution of 921,000 pixels and is permanently installed (i.e. not foldable), a touch function is also missing.

The LX100’s housing is larger than that of its predecessors and offers space for four buttons above the screen and four additional controls to the right of the screen. The four-weigher with central knob surrounds a rotating ring. It’s even halfway pleasant to use, without the gross motorist having to press the keys right away. Three of the buttons are freely assignable and an additional Quick Menu provides access to all important settings. The way to the somewhat confusing main menu with its five tabs and up to nine pages is therefore only necessary for important basic settings (the individual menu alone has 41 menu items). For the photo everyday life one gets along however well with the Quick menu.

The tripod thread is located outside the optical axis directly next to the battery and memory card compartment, which is blocked when the tripod is used. In addition to the SD memory card (SDHC- and SDXC-compatible), there is a 7.4 Wh lithium-ion battery in the compartment, which is sufficient for a good 300 shots. An external charger is included with the camera. Since the LX100 does not have an internal flash, it comes with a small flash that fits inside the shoe. Large system flash units can also be used here. In addition to Micro-HDMI (Type D), the LX100 also has a combined USB AV socket behind a plastic flap for interfaces.

The fourth and last advantage is to be found on the back and an innovation in the LX class: It is a video viewfinder with 2.76 million pixels resolution. This makes it one of the highest resolution video viewfinders currently available. A diopter correction and a proximity sensor for activating the viewfinder are also available. The viewfinder has a magnification factor of 0.7 for 35mm images, exceeding the usual APS-C DSLRs. He even almost equals full-format bolides. Due to the small exit pupil, the viewfinder is not completely manageable for spectacle wearers, only without glasses you can get close enough with the eye. Due to the ultra-fine resolution there are hardly any stairs left to be seen. The viewfinder shows a pleasant, albeit somewhat cool picture compared to the screen. This is no big deal, because the viewfinder and monitor can be adjusted separately in brightness, contrast, colour saturation and colour temperature in two axes (red/green and blue/yellow).

The viewfinder image is displayed at 60 frames per second without jerk or delay. Only in very dark environments does the frame rate decrease, but the subject is much brighter and easier to recognize than in an optical viewfinder. Not to mention the fact that Live View not only has lots of fade-ins, but also an exposure and white balance preview. The viewfinder only shows a preview of the later image brightness when the shutter release button is pressed halfway. For example, when working with flashes, the viewfinder image remains bright even with small apertures and short exposure times, for manual focusing, for example.

The 3 inch screen (7.5 centimeters diagonal) on the back resolves 921,000 pixels and is unfortunately firmly installed, even a touch function is missing. The housing of the LX100 is significantly larger than that of the predecessor models of the LX series, even the smallest mirrorless system cameras from Panasonic GM1 and GM5 are much smaller. But they can’t come up with such a fast zoom or such a high resolution viewfinder. In any case, the housing of the LX100 offers space for four buttons above the screen and four additional controls to the right of the screen. The four-way rocker with central knob surrounds a rotating ring. It’s even halfway pleasant to use, without the gross motorist having to press the keys right away. Three of the buttons are freely assignable and an additional Quick Menu provides access to all important settings. Calling up the somewhat confusing main menu with its five tabs and up to nine pages is therefore only necessary for important basic settings. For the photo everyday life one gets along very well with the Quick menu.

The SD memory card (SDHC and SDXC compatible) and a 7.4 Wh lithium-ion battery make an impression. An external charger is included with the camera. According to the CIPA standard, the battery should be sufficient for 300 shots when using the rear monitor. When using the electronic viewfinder there are 30 images less. Without the included flash, for a built-in flash it was obviously not enough, there are 50 more shots in it. In addition to Micro-HDMI (Type D), the LX100 also has a combined USB AV socket behind a plastic flap for interfaces. A USB cable is supplied, but the AV or HDMI cable is not.

Despite the rather large and almost 400 gram heavy case, Panasonic no longer found enough space on the underside to place the tripod thread in the optical axis. It is also located directly next to the battery and memory card compartment, which can thus be mounted on a tripod or fitted with a quick-release plate and can no longer be opened. In the compartment, whose plastic flap has a reasonably robust

The SD memory card (SDHC and SDXC compatible) and a 7.4 Wh lithium-ion battery make an impression. An external charger is included with the camera. According to the CIPA standard, the battery should be sufficient for 300 shots when using the rear monitor. When using the electronic viewfinder there are 30 images less. Without the included flash, for a built-in flash it was obviously not enough, there are 50 more shots in it. In addition to Micro-HDMI (Type D), the LX100 also has a combined USB AV socket behind a plastic flap for interfaces. A USB cable is supplied, but the AV or HDMI cable is not.

The flash is not built into the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100, but is supplied as a small attachable flash.
The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has a lithium-ion battery and SD memory card in one compartment. The lithium-ion battery is sufficient for about 300 CIPA-standard images when using the rear screen, with the viewfinder it is 30 images less

Equipment

Despite the iA button, the Lumix LX100 is aimed at ambitious photographers who know how to handle the aperturer or aperture ring and the exposure time wheel. The ISO sensitivity is preselected by pressing a key and then adjusting the setting using the rear rotary knob. A wide range from ISO 100 to 25,600 is available. The ISO auto function works conveniently when the aperture and shutter speed are selected manually. The maximum sensitivity can be specified.

A programme selector wheel with scene programmes is not found. But Panasonic still didn’t want to give the LX100 a “panic button”. When iA is pressed, the camera makes all settings automatically. She even selects a motif that matches the motif of the motif program that you can’t get to manually. But attention: The exposure compensation wheel also works in iA. Since it ranges from -3 EV to +3 EV, you can also mess up the photo in iA with an accidentally adjusted exposure correction wheel. On the one hand it is to be welcomed that the photographer can influence the exposure in spite of iA, on the other hand Panasonic could have given the choice of whether the correction wheel works in iA to a menu entry with default setting “No”. That would have made the camera really “foolproof”.

With the silver version, the small lettering is somewhat easier to read in diffuse light than with the black Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100.

The 49-point autofocus works fast. In the test lab, it took just 0.16 seconds from pressing the shutter button to taking a wide-angle picture. In telescopic position, focusing and triggering takes place within 0.26 seconds. This includes a 0.04 second release delay, which also occurs during pre-focusing. If you wish, you can limit the number of focus measuring fields or even focus on just one point. Slide the switch directly on the lens to toggle between autofocus, macro-automatic autofocus and manual focus. The close-up limit for macro lenses is three centimetres from the front lens in the wide-angle position, whereas the 30 centimetres in the telescopic position do not allow such a high magnification. A close-up lens that can be screwed into the 43 mm front thread of the lens like other filters can help here. The infinitely variable electronic adjustment ring on the lens allows sensitive manual focusing. Focus magnifier, focus peaking and a focus scale support this. The ring can also be used to adjust the focal length as an alternative to the zoom lever. As an alternative to the stepless zoom, fixed zoom levels can also be activated.

The LX100’s continuous shooting function impresses with more than eleven frames per second and large JPEG buffer memory. However, neither a focus tracking nor a display of the live image takes place. Instead, the previous exposure is always displayed on the screen. With Live View, a maximum of seven series images per second is possible, with focus tracking it is 6.5. In raw format, on the other hand, the promised eleven images per second are missed by far. The electronic closure proves to be very practical. The mechanical shutter is already extremely quiet thanks to the central shutter with shutter speeds of up to 1/4,000 seconds. But the electronic shutter works silently. It also allows short exposure times of up to 1/16,000 second.

As one of the few current compact cameras, the LX100 supports 4K video, but only with a maximum of 25 frames per second. After 15 minutes in a row, the current recording is finished. Because the pixels are used 1:1, the 35mm zoom equivalent is 26 to 81 millimeters. In full HD, the Lumix enables up to 50 full frames per second for almost 30 minutes at a time without image trimming. Image stabilization is achieved with the aid of the noiseless optical image stabilizer. The soft tracking of the autofocus and the soft zoom are not detected by the internal stereo microphone. Unfortunately, the LX100 does not have a connection for an external stereo microphone. After all, the audio level can be displayed and corrected. A wind noise filter can also be switched on. The video format available is either AVCHD or MP4.

The Panasonic LX100 offers an automatic HDR and panorama function. The latter is hidden in the recording mode setting. You can also find the self-timer and the continuous-advance function there. The bracketing mode allows three, five, or seven shots. The distance between the exposures is either 1/3, 2/3 or 1 EV. It therefore covers a maximum of +/-3 EV. In HDR mode, three automatically captured images are calculated and aligned in the camera. Here, too, the photographer can choose between 1, 2 and 3 EV exposure distances if he does not want to rely on the automatic mode.

The filter button on the top of the camera allows you to choose between a proud 22 filter effects. There are quite a few worth seeing. However, these filters can no longer be applied to photos that have already been taken. Raw images can be converted to JPEG directly in the camera. Thanks to WLAN and NFC, the LX100 allows easy coupling with smartphones and tablets. In addition to image transmission, a remote control of the camera including live image transmission is also possible with the help of the corresponding app.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

Behind a small plastic flap on the handle side of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100, the HDMI and USB interfaces are concealed. The battery, however, is charged externally in the supplied charging cradle and not via USB.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

The lens of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 impresses above all with its high speed from F1.7 to F2.8. The 16 megapixel Micro Four Thirds sensor uses only a partial range with a maximum resolution of 12.8 megapixels.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

Unlike the rest of the case, the left side of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 case is made of plastic. This is where the NFC chip is hidden.

Picture quality

With the proven 16 megapixel CMOS sensor in Micro Four Thirds format (17.3 x 13 millimeters) and the specially calculated Leica lens, the LX100 should offer the best conditions for high image quality.

In fact, the LX100 doesn’t exactly get famous for its signal-to-noise ratio despite its large pixel pitch of 3.7 µm. Even at the lowest sensitivity, it only starts in the acceptable range of less than 40 dB. Even at ISO 400, the signal-to-noise ratio is only just over 35 dB and drops below that at ISO 800. In addition, the LX100 allows brightness noise to be easily visible even from ISO 800. After all, color noise plays practically no role. Thanks to the low noise suppression, the LX100 is able to display many details even in very high sensitivity ranges. The texture sharpness is in the very good range up to ISO 1.600, even up to ISO 6.400 the detail drawing remains good before it rapidly plummets over it. From ISO 200 to 6,400, the input dynamics with 9.7 to 10.3 f-stops also achieve good values.

While the tonal value curve is relatively moderate, the LX100 shows an untypical colour reproduction with some quite high deviations. Cyan not only has a distinct blue cast, but even tends towards violet. Actual violet tones on the other hand show an oversaturation. The shades of green, yellow and orange, on the other hand, are very neutral. Even the red, which other manufacturers like to saturate more strongly, is only slightly brighter than in the original. The precise manual white balance, on the other hand, is not to be objected at all.

In the laboratory test, the 24-75mm zoom initially shows sufficient sharpness from the center of the image to the edge of the image at all apertures and focal lengths for images 20 x 30 centimeters in size (about DIN A4 as we are using European standards). Also the distortion is low, colour fringes hardly occur and the edge darkening can also be neglected. But the resolution measurement at 50 percent edge contrast (MTF50) brings it to light: in wide-angle, the resolution at the edge of the image is only about half the level of the center resolution. It doesn’t matter whether the photo is taken with an open aperture or with a dimmed aperture. In the centre, a solid but not very record-breaking 40 line pairs per millimetre (lp/mm) are achieved. Even with a medium focal length of about 38 millimeters, the corresponding 35mm image resolution drop to the image edge is a good 20 lp/mm. However, it comes from a higher level of around 47 lp/mm. At best, the edge drop of the resolution is only about 25 percent at 38 millimeters and F5.6. In the telescopic position, the edge drop of the resolution from F4 hardly appears. On the other hand, the overall resolution of less than 30 lp/mm is at a rather low level.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 has a lithium-ion battery and SD memory card in one compartment. The lithium-ion battery is sufficient for about 300 CIPA-standard images when using the rear screen, with the viewfinder it is 30 images less.

Panasonic LX 100 Review

Unfortunately, the tripod thread of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 is neither in the optical axis nor far enough away from the battery and memory card compartment to be able to open it in tripod mode or with a tripod exchange plate.

The ISO sensitivity is preselected by pressing a key and then adjusting the setting using the rear rotary knob. A wide range from ISO 100 to 25,600 is available. Which of these is useful can be found below in the section Image Quality. Depending on the menu setting, the sensitivity can be set in whole f-stops or in fine third steps. It is praiseworthy that the ISO automatic also works with manual selection of aperture and shutter speed. One way of setting the ISO sensitivity control range is to set the maximum sensitivity.

In the field of continuous shooting, the LX100 impresses on paper with up to eleven frames per second. However, neither a focus tracking nor a display of the live image takes place. Instead, the previous exposure is always displayed on the screen. With Live-View, a maximum of seven serial images per second is possible, with focus tracking it is 6.5. In our measurement, the LX100 in JPEG format even exceeds the factory specification. It achieves 11.9 continuous frames per second for an impressive 93 consecutive shots. In raw format, on the other hand, the eleven frames per second are missed by far. We achieved a maximum of 8.7 frames per second in the test for a maximum of 24 frames in a row. The continuous run in JPEG is at least 5.2 frames per second. Raw achieves 2.2 frames per second. The bottleneck here is the SD memory card. Panasonic even supports the UHS-I speed class 3 standard, which is a prerequisite for 4K video recording. The electronic closure proves to be very practical. Although the mechanical shutter is already extremely quiet thanks to the central shutter with shutter speeds of up to 1/4,000 seconds, the electronic shutter works silently. It also allows short exposure times of up to 1/16,000 second.

Video

In the video sector, the LX100 is currently one of the few cameras to support 4K recording. However, the maximum refresh rate is 25 frames per second. After 15 minutes at the latest, the current recording is also ended. Another side effect of 4K video recording is a reduction in the image area used. The 35 mm zoom equivalent is then 26 to 81 millimetres. This makes the image trimming much less dramatic than with the Lumix DMC-GH4. This is because the LX100 never uses the entire image sensor anyway. In full HD, the Lumix enables up to 50 full frames per second for almost 30 minutes at a time. There is no image trimming. As in photo mode, the full 24 millimetres wide-angle can be used with 16:9 aspect ratio. Image stabilization for video recordings is achieved with the aid of the optical image stabilizer. It is built into the lens and works silently. Focus and zoom sounds are not picked up by the internal stereo microphone. It looks different with hand noises. For example, if you adjust the exposure time during shooting. The zoom runs smoothly and slowly during video recording. The focus is also well tracked without pumping too much. The exposure is also adjusted. This can be done via exposure time, aperture and/or ISO sensitivity.

Unfortunately, the LX100 does not have a connection for an external stereo microphone. So you have to be content with the integrated stereo microphone. It sits in front of the flash shoe on the upper side of the housing. After all, the audio level can be displayed and corrected. A wind noise filter can also be switched on. The video format available is either AVCHD or MP4. A big drawback for some videographers: the HDMI connection of the LX100 only works in playback mode. There is no live image and certainly no pure signal for external recording.

The Panasonic LX100 has an HDR function and a panorama mode for special functions. Some effect filters are also on board. The panorama mode is hidden in the shooting mode setting. You can also find the self-timer and the continuous-advance function there. It allows panorama shots of 8,176 x 1,920 pixels (15.7 megapixels) in landscape format with a simple pan shot. In portrait format it is 7,680 x 2,560 pixels (19.7 megapixels). However, stitching errors may occur. Those who really want to create high-resolution panorama shots will still need a manual adjustment, a tripod and a good panorama head.

The bracketing mode allows three, five, or seven shots. The distance between the exposures is either 1/3, 2/3 or 1 EV. It therefore covers a maximum of +/-3 EV. In addition, an HDR mode allows automatic exposure bracketing. Three images are automatically calculated and aligned. Here too, the photographer can choose between 1, 2 and 3 EV exposure distances. Or he leaves this to the automatic.

The filter button on the top of the camera allows you to choose between a proud 22 filter effects. There are quite a few worth seeing. So if you don’t want to deal with image processing, you can let off steam here. However, these filters can no longer be applied to photos that have already been taken. Raw images can be converted to JPEG directly in the camera. For videos there is at least a function “share videos” in the sense of divide, cut (not in the sense of “share on Facebook”). Time-lapse images can also be used to combine time-lapse or stop motion videos. The LX100 offers WLAN including NFC, which allows easy pairing with smartphones and tablets. This allows images to be transferred. With the help of the corresponding app even a remote control of the camera including live image transmission is possible. This also works with running video recording (also in 4K), but the preview image is only of low resolution (VGA resolution at best).

Lens

Panasonic has designed a completely new lens for the Lumix DMC-LX100. As usual with the LX series, the focus was on image quality and light intensity. Also the compactness was not despised. A huge zoom factor, on the other hand, doesn’t play a role in the LX series. The result was a F1.7 to F2.8 fast 3.1x zoom lens with a 35mm equivalent focal length range of 24 to 75 millimetres. From landscape and architectural shots, even in low light, to portraits, the lens covers a wide range of uses. The exemption qualities, for example, should not be despised. Of course, the LX100 doesn’t come close to the clipping potential of a full-frame camera with a fast fixed focal length, but it doesn’t have to. After all, the LX100 is much more compact and lighter. The lens is adorned with a Leica label that underlines the optical quality (more on this in the “Image quality” section). It has nine aperture slats with an almost circular opening. In fact, a very creamy, pleasant bokeh is produced, as hardly any other compact camera can.

The lens of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 impresses above all with its high light intensity from F1.7 to F2.8. The 16 megapixel resolving Micro-Four-Thirds sensor uses only a partial range with a maximum resolution of 12.8 megapixels.

The fixed part of the lens alone protrudes almost three centimeters from the body. It gets 3.3 centimeters longer when you switch it on. In telescopic position, it stretches another 5.3 centimetres out of the housing. All in all, it’s a proud eight centimeters from the front of the housing, remarkable for such a “short” zoom lens (with a small telephoto focal length). The closest focusing distance is three centimetres from the front lens in the wide-angle position. This is very well suited for close-ups, a motif measuring about 5 x 3.8 centimetres can be photographed in full format. This corresponds approximately to an image scale of 1:3.1 or even 1:1.4 according to 35mm. Light still falls on the motif. Insects, however, will surely have long since taken flight because of the scanning “monster”. In the telescopic position, the close-up limit is 30 centimeters and is suitable for close-ups, but not for macros. Filters can be screwed on thanks to the 43 mm front thread. With a commercially available close-up lens, one can make the lens “short-sighted” by a few dioptres, for example, for telemacros.

The lens cap is a little annoying in view of the fact that it is a compact camera. It must be removed manually. If you secure it with the enclosed ribbon, it will also rattle around in the wind in a disturbing way. Without the lid, the 3.3 centimetre front lens is unprotected. But there is a remedy in the original Panasonic accessories program. The fixed part of the lens has a ring at the front that can be removed. Here hides a bayonet that is not intended for a sun visor. There is no such device for the LX100. The bayonet is fitted with an automatic lid, which we think Panasonic would be happy to supply. This cover opens mechanically in three segments when switched on by the extending lens. This may not look pretty, but it is very practical.

Unlike the rest of the case, the left side of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 case is made of plastic. This is where the NFC chip is hidden.

The lens has four control elements. The upper slide switch has nothing directly to do with the lens, here you select the aspect ratio. Thanks to the multi-format sensor, the diagonal image angle remains identical at 4:3, 3:2 and 16:9 as described at the beginning of the test. On the left side of the lens, you can easily switch between autofocus, autofocus with macro automatic and manual focus. A continuously variable electronic adjustment ring is located in front of it. If you switch to manual focus, this will focus. The focus can be adjusted very sensitively. It is supported by a three- to six-fold focus magnifier, focus peaking (colored raising of the sharp contrast edges) as well as a focus scale. The scale is unfortunately only a rather useless rough orientation. Neither the depth of field nor the numerical distance are displayed here. However, thanks to the good focus loupe, manual focusing is still easy. It is only displayed in the middle of the screen, so you can keep an eye on the overall design.

The comparison with the small interchangeable lens system camera GM5 shows that the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 is already quite big. But compared to the GM5 shown here, the LX100 has the faster lens and the higher resolution viewfinder.

 

The front ring on the lens is used to adjust the aperture. It is labeled and rests in third steps. The automatic position is also marked in red here. However, it locks only slightly more heavily than the other aperture stops. This does not provide any special protection if you want to remain in the aperture or program automatic mode. Caution is also advised when zooming. The aperture only opens as far as the zoom position allows, contrary to the label. In telescopic position, the first five detents mean all F2.8.

Zoom: On the one hand, this can be operated almost steplessly with the zoom lever, which encloses the shutter release circularly (we were able to count 33 zoom levels), on the other hand, it can also be zoomed with the electronic ring on the lens. However, only as long as the focus is automatic. Optionally, a step zoom can be activated for the ring. Then only the zoom levels 24, 28, 35, 50, 70 and 75 millimetres are approached. The zoom lever remains stepless. In contrast to distance, the focal length is displayed exactly both numerically and additionally in the zoom bar.

Panasonic focuses on the DFD (Depth from Defocus) technology introduced with the Lumix DMC-GH4. This is basically a contrast autofocus. But with two blurred images with different focus settings, the LX100 can calculate the correct focus point in advance and precisely approach it. DFD technology therefore works in a similar way to a phase autofocus. He also knows exactly in which direction and how far the focus motor has to be adjusted. The fine adjustment is still done with the conventional contrast autofocus. Only the way there is even faster with the new technology. In the test lab, it took just 0.16 seconds from pressing the shutter button to taking a wide-angle picture. In telescopic position, focusing and triggering takes place within 0.26 seconds. This includes 0.04 seconds of release delay each time. This also occurs without focusing, i.e. the autofocus takes 0.12 to 0.22 seconds. This is a remarkable speed on the level of modern system cameras without a backlash. This is much faster than most DSLRs anyway. The automatic selects from 49 focus measuring fields. The photographer can also put together an individual set of measuring fields. Or he just selects the center focus point. In addition, the focus point can be set to a very small field. This can be very useful in macro photography, for example, so that the focus point is exactly on the flower pistill. In addition, there is face and eye recognition, practical for portraits. You can also activate a pursuit autofocus that follows a captured motif with astonishing determination. Even if the object leaves the image section for a short time, it is taken into focus again after reappearing.

Picture quality

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 should actually have excellent prerequisites for high image quality at system camera level. Finally, it features the proven 16 megapixel CMOS sensor in Micro Four Thirds format (17.3 x 13 millimetres).

Despite its large pitch of 3.7 µm, the Lumix LX100 doesn’t exactly get a lot of fame when it comes to the signal-to-noise ratio. Even with the lowest sensitivity, it only starts in the acceptable range of less than 40 dB but clearly above 35 dB. Even at ISO 400, the signal-to-noise ratio is only just over 35 dB. From ISO 800 it is lower, then the image signal no longer stands out so clearly from the noise. At ISO 12.800 and 25.600 the value is even below 30 dB. In addition, the LX100 allows brightness noise to be easily visible even from ISO 800. From ISO 12.800 it becomes more visible. After all, color noise plays practically no role. Thanks to the low noise suppression, the LX100 is able to display many details even in very high sensitivity ranges.

The texture sharpness is in the very good range up to ISO 1.600, even slightly above the ideal of 1. Up to ISO 6.400, the detail drawing remains good, but above that it drops rapidly. Another clear sign that it is better not to operate the camera beyond ISO 6,400. From ISO 200 to 6,400, the input dynamics with 9.7 to 10.3 f-stops also achieve good values. The fact that it is significantly worse at ISO 100 with 9.2 f-stops compared to the 10.3 f-stops at ISO 200 is simply due to the basic sensitivity of the ISO 200 sensor. This means that at ISO 100 the signal has to be attenuated by one f-stop.

This signal attenuation at ISO 100 is also reflected in the tonal value transmission. The tonal value curve at ISO 100 is remarkably flat. From ISO 200 it is significantly steeper, but still relatively moderate. It looks different with the colour rendition. It is not particularly exact or neutral. Although slight deviations as “characteristics” of a camera manufacturer are not uncommon, the LX100 is a bit more out of the ordinary. Cyan has not only a distinct blue, but even a slight red tinge, so that it almost tends to shimmer slightly violet. Actual violet tones on the other hand show an oversaturation. The shades of green, yellow and orange, on the other hand, are very neutral. Even the red, which other manufacturers like to saturate more strongly, is only slightly brighter than in the original. The manual white balance works very accurately and is not objectionable. The automatic system only tends to deviate more strongly in warm artificial lighting situations or with dim candlelighting. They can be controlled with manual settings.

The 24-75mm zoom lens initially shows sufficient sharpness for 20 x 30 centimetre images (about DIN A4) in the laboratory test. This applies to all apertures and focal lengths from the center of the image to the edge of the image. However, a slight decrease in sharpness towards the edges of the image can be seen in the wide angle. In practice, however, this is not visible. Resolution measurement at 50 percent edge contrast (MTF50) then brings it to light. In wide-angle, the resolution at the edge of the picture is only about half the resolution of the center. It doesn’t matter whether the photo is taken with an open aperture or with a dimmed aperture. This is very disappointing for such a zoom. When magnified, the soft edges of landscape and architectural images are unpleasantly noticeable. In the center, approximately 40 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) are reached. This is truly no record for 12.8 megapixels, but a solid performance. The LX100 is not as brave as many other cameras when it comes to image processing. However, the only 20 lp/mm at the edge of the picture are disappointing. When dipping down, the LX100 at F5.6 barely scratches the 25 lp/mm at the edge of the picture. But even that is hardly suitable for more than just sharp corners up to DIN A4. Even with a medium focal length of about 38 millimeters, the resolution drop to the edge of the image is a good 20 lp/mm. However, it comes from a higher level of around 47 lp/mm. At best, the marginal drop in resolution is only about 25 percent at 38 millimeters and F5.6 (42 lp/mm in the center, 30 lp/mm at the edge). In telescopic position, the edge drop of the resolution from F4 hardly appears anymore. On the other hand, the overall resolution of less than 30 lp/mm is at a rather low level. Otherwise, the optical performance is impressive: The distortion is low, color fringes hardly occur and the edge darkening can also be neglected.

All in all, it can be said that the lens quite hangs up the image quality, which is quite good in itself. You’ve seen much better from Leica and Panasonic! Perhaps the compromises the manufacturer had to make in lens design were a little too big. But basically, apart from the picture corners, the image quality of the LX100 is very good, especially for a compact camera. Thanks above all to the light intensity and the large pixels, the camera is still able to deliver impressive picture results even in low ambient light. Even if there is a slight brightness noise to be seen. If you use the raw format and are familiar with its development on the PC, you can also get a bit more sharpness of detail, less noise and better colours out of the pictures.

Alternatives To The Panasonic LX100

Those who are interested in the LX100 for a recommended retail price of almost 700 Euro will ask themselves whether they would rather buy a system camera for this price or which alternatives are available in the compact camera segment. We cannot name all the alternatives here, but by way of example we would like to mention at least three obvious competitors.

Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

In the compact camera segment, the image quality standard for the LX100 includes the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II. The Canon is even bigger and heavier than the Panasonic and not so chic and classy. It has a slightly lower maximum resolution (according to line pairs per millimeter), but a sharper edge lens, but also more sharpness artifacts. The Canon has the better signal-to-noise ratio, the LX100 the better texture sharpness, especially at high ISO, and there also the better dynamic range. Overall, the Canon is rated 2% better in image quality (so the edge sharpness has quite a bit of weight). The Canon’s sensor is even bigger than that of the LX100 and the lens has a larger zoom range, but the lens is not as fast. The G1 X Mark II is painfully missing a viewfinder, but the monitor is foldable.

The Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II is larger than the Lumix LX100, but also has a slightly larger sensor and the lens has a larger zoom range. [Photo: Canon]

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5

In the system camera area one could certainly make a comparison with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5. It has a higher resolution (16 megapixels effective), its standard 3x zoom also fights with a high edge drop (at least in wide angle and telephoto, but not quite as much as the LX100). Signal-to-noise ratio, texture sharpness, noise and dynamic range are on a very similar level, whereby one can argue here of course that the 2 f-stops (!) faster lens of the LX100 does not require such high sensitivities. Apart from the fact that the LX100 is the better equipped camera of the two and is also easier to use. The GM5 only gets better when you change its lens to a better one.

The competition from our own house: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5. The LX100 will only be better than the LX100 if you take a better object instead of the flat standard zoom shown here, best of all the Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 15 mm F1.7 Asph. With the fixed focal length the GM5 also costs more than 1,000 Euros. [Photo: Panasonic]

Sony CyberShot DSC-RX100 III

Another alternative is of course the Sony RX100 III, which is smaller and lighter. The Sony has a significantly higher resolution than the LX100, but also an enormous edge drop in the wide-angle. The signal-to-noise ratio of the RX100 III is slightly better, the texture sharpness at a similar level (here the higher basic resolution plays in and helps the Sony to achieve good readings). The Sony also achieves the same level of input dynamics as the LX100. The RX100 III ultimately has a bit more image quality than the LX100. The final score of the RX100 III is the same as that of the Panasonic (the Panasonic is better equipped, better crafted, just as easy to use according to the rating (here you could certainly discuss whether the Panasonic with its many controls should not even do better) and it is also faster than the Sony. The Sony is much smaller and lighter.

The Sony RX100 III is smaller and lighter than the Lumix LX100, but achieves about the same level of image quality. [Photo: Sony]

Bottom line

Despite its intelligent automatic control, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 is clearly aimed at ambitious photographers. You want to consciously influence the aperture and exposure time using the control dials. With its F1.7 to 2.8 fast lens and the large image sensor, the LX100 offers good basic conditions for this. Even though you can’t expect her to do miracles of exemption. Despite its 4K video mode, the LX100 is less suitable for ambitious videographers. But simply important functions like a microphone connection or an HDMI output signal are missing during recording. Nevertheless, the on-board functions of the video capabilities are impressive. They allow high quality recreational shots. Actually, the LX100 is not really a small camera. However, in view of its equipment with large sensor, powerful zoom and large high-resolution electronic viewfinder, it is very compact. In addition, it is very high quality processed. The screen lacks touch and folding facilities. Many a conservative photographer will certainly welcome this rather than miss it. The other equipment offers many possibilities including remote control via WLAN. The LX100 has to leave its mark on image quality to some extent. Overall, this is at a very high level. Panasonic doesn’t get the most out of this sensor only in terms of resolution and noise-free performance. Anyone who works in Raw may get over it. However, the edge blur of the lens cannot be discussed away. However, this compromise must simply be accepted in view of its compactness. Nevertheless the LX100 is a very recommendable camera. She has everything on board that you need for everyday photography.

Fact sheet

Fact sheet
Manufacturer Panasonic
Model Lumix DMC-LX100
Sensor CMOS 4/3″ 17.3 x 13.0 mm (crop factor 2.0
)16.8 megapixels (physical)
12.8 megapixels (effective)
Crop factor effective 2,2-fold
Pixel pitch 4.2 µm
Resolution (max.) 4.112 x 3.088 (4:3)
Video (max.) 3.840 x 2.160 25p
Lens F1,7-2,8/24-75mm
Filter threads 43 mm built-in
Video viewfinder EVF, 100 % field coverage, 2,764,000 pixels resolution, 1.39x magnification (sensor related), 0.70x magnification (KB equivalent), diopter compensation (-4.0 to 3.0 dpt)
Monitor 3.0″ (7.5 cm)
Disbandment 921.000 pixels
tiltable
rotatable
swivelling
Touchscreen
AV connector HDMI Output Micro (Type D)
Fully automatic yes
Automatic motif control yes
Program automation yes
Program shift yes
Aperture priority yes
Aperture priority yes
Manual yes
Bulb long time exposure yes
HDR function yes
Panorama function yes, Sweep panorama
Exposure metering Multi-field, Centre-weighted Integral, Spot
fastest shutter speed 1/16.000 s
Lightning bolt included attachable flash
Synchronous time 1/4.000 s
Flash connection Olympus/Panasonic (also Leica compact camera), standard center contact flash shoe
WLAN yes
NFC yes
GPS external, smartphone as GPS logger
Remote release yes, remote control via Smartphone/Tablet
Interval shooting
Storage medium
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
Sensitivity
automatic ISO 200-25.600
manually ISO 100-25.600
White balance
automatic yes
manual measurement yes
Kelvin input yes
Fine correction yes
Autofocus yes
Number of measuring fields 49 Contrast sensors
Speed 0.16 to 0.26 s
AF auxiliary light LED
Dimensions (WxHxD) 115 x 66 x 55 mm
Weight (ready for operation) 391 g
Tripod socket outside the optical axis
Zoom
Zoom adjustment Lens ring (motorized), ring rocker (motorized)
Battery life 300 images according to CIPA standard
– = “not applicable” or “not available”

Short evaluation

Pros

  • Powerful lens with fast autofocus
  • Over-complete equipment with almost all chicanes
  • Very good operation thanks to many keys and wheels
  • High-quality processed housing
  • Very good image quality up to ISO 800, good at 1,600 and usable at 3,200

Cons

  • No locking of aperture ring and exposure time wheel in automatic position
  • Fixed screen without touch function
  • Lens with clearly decreasing resolution at the image edge

Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor 4/3″ 17.3 x 13.0 mm (crop factor 2.0
)16.8 megapixels (physical), 12.8 megapixels (effective)
Crop factor effective 2,2
Pixel pitch 4.2 µm
Photo resolution
4.480 x 2.520 pixels (16:9)
4.272 x 2.856 pixels (3:2)
4.112 x 3.088 Pixel (4:3)
3.088 x 3.088 Pixel (1:1)
Picture formats JPG, RAW
Colour depth 24 bits (8 bits per color channel), 36 bits (12 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif, DCF standard
Video resolution
3.840 x 2.160 (16:9) 25 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 i
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 50 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 25 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 24 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 25 p
Video format
AVCHD (Codec H.264)
MP4 (codec MPEG-4)

Lens

Focal length 24 to 75 mm (35mm equivalent
)3.1x Zoom10
.9 to 34 mm (physical)
Digital zoom 4x
Focus range 50 cm to infinity (wide-angle
)50 cm to infinity (telephoto)
Macro sector 3 cm (wide-angle
)30 cm (telephoto)
Apertures F1.7 to F16 (wide-angle
)F2.8 to F16 (telephoto)
Autofocus yes
Autofocus mode Contrast autofocus with 49 measuring fields
Autofocus Functions Single Auto Focus, Continuous Auto Focus, Tracking Auto Focus, Manual, AFL Function, AF Assist Light (LED), Focus Peaking, Focus Magnifier
Filter threads 43 mm

Viewfinder and Monitor

Monitor 3.0″ (7.5 cm) TFT LCD monitor with 921,000 pixels, anti-glare, brightness adjustable, colour adjustable
Video viewfinder Video viewfinder (100 % field coverage) with 2,764,000 pixels, magnification factor 1.39x (0.70x KB equivalent), diopter compensation (-4.0 to 3.0 dpt)

Exposure

Exposure metering Center-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement, spot measurement, AF-AE coupling
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 60 s (Auto
)1/16,000 to 1 s (Manual)Bulb Function
Exposure control Fully automatic, Program automatic (with program shift), Aperture priority, Aperture priority, Manual, Scene automatic
Bracketing function Exposure bracketing function with maximum 7 shots, step size from 1/3 to 1 EV, HDR function
Exposure compensation -3.0 to +3.0 EV with step size of 1/3 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 200 to ISO 25.600 (automatic
)ISO 100 to ISO 25.600 (manual)
Remote access Remote control via Smartphone/Tablet
Picture effects brilliant, high key, individual, landscape, low key, portrait, black and white, sepia, toy camera, soft focus, 16 additional image effects
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Fine-tune, Shadow, Flash, Fluorescent lamp, Incandescent lamp, Kelvin input, Manual 4 memory locations
Color space Adobe RGB, sRGB
Continuous shooting 11 fps at highest resolution, 40 frames per second n´mit electronic shutter
Self-timer Self-timer with interval of 2 s, special features: or 10 seconds, triple release after 10 seconds
Shooting functions AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Lightning bolt no built-in flash availableFlash shoe
: Olympus/Panasonic (also Leica compact camera), standard center contact
Flash range included attachable flash0
.6 to 14.1 m at wide angle0
.3 to 8.5 m at TeleFlash range
at ISO automatic flash sync time
1/4,000 s
Flash functions Auto, Fill-in flash, Flash on, Flash off, Slow sync, Flash on second shutter curtain, Red-eye reduction by pre-flash, Flash exposure correction

Equipment

Image stabilizer optical image stabilizer
Memory
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
Panorama Swivel panorama
GPS function GPS external (Smartphone as GPS-Logger)
Power supply no power supply connection
Power supply 1 x lithium ion (Li-Ion) battery (7.2 V, 1.025 mAh
)300 images according to CIPA standard
Playback Functions Red eye retouching, crop images, image rotation, protect image, playback histogram, playback magnifier, image index, slide show function, zoom out
Face recognition Face recognition
Picture parameters Sharpness, Contrast, Saturation, Noise Reduction, Color Effects: Brilliant colors, Customization, Landscape, Portrait, Black & White
Grid can be faded in during recording yes
Special functions Electronic spirit level, Orientation sensor, Zebra function, Live View
Ports Data interfaces: USBUSB type
: USB 2.0 High SpeedWLAN
: available (type: B, G, N)
NFC: availableAudio output
: noAudio input
: noVideo output
: yes (HDMI output Micro (type D))
Supported direct printing methods DPOF, PictBridge
Tripod socket 1/4″ not in optical axis

Size and weight

Weight 391 g (ready for operation)
Dimensions W x H x D 115 x 66 x 55 mm

Other

included accessories Lithium-ion battery, battery charger, USB cable, external flash, lens cap, strap, CD-ROM (Silkypix Developer Edition, PhotoFun Studio 9.6)
optional accessory Olympus FL-700WR Slip-on flash with swivel reflector
USB
USB 2.0 High Speed

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