Canon Rebel T6i Review – Canon EOS 750D and 760D for  ambitious amateur photographers: Expansion of the DSLR offering

With the EOS 750D and the EOS 760D, Canon offers two almost identical models in the hobby DSLR area, but they differ from each other in the user interface. Canon is also saying goodbye to the 18-megapixel sensor and is catching up with the competition with its own 24-megapixel sensor. In addition, thanks to new phase AF sensors on the sensor, the Live View autofocus should finally become faster. So the two DSLRs promise a lot as to whether they can keep it, the test shows.

With the two models EOS 750D and 760D Canon introduces two successor models of the EOS 650D, while the EOS 700D remains in the program. Both the 750D and the largely identical 760D use a new APS-C large CMOS sensor with 24.2 megapixels resolution and a greatly improved hybrid CMOS AF III in Live View mode, which also benefits video recordings. The difference between 750D and 760D lies in the more advanced user interface of the 760D.

The program selector wheel on the 760D is on the left shoulder instead of the right, and it can also be locked. This leaves room for a small status display on the right shoulder. The operating interfaces also differ on the rear side: while the 750D has simple four-direction keys, the 760D is equipped with a rocker switch and a surrounding second setting wheel. This is intended to appeal to the 760D buyers who are satisfied with the 750D’s features, but would like a user interface that is more similar to that of the 70D. Also reserved for the 760D is the proximity sensor on the reflex viewfinder, which automatically shuts off the screen as soon as the camera is taken up to the eye.

The two new sisters, on the other hand, have the same technical equipment. For example, they have a three-inch screen with a resolution of over one million pixels. The monitor can be rotated and swivelled, allowing shots to be taken from all possible angles. In addition, it is a touch screen with a user-friendly touch interface if you don’t want to operate the 750D or 760D with keys and menus.

The new APS-C sensor in CMOS design resolves 24.2 megapixels and offers a sensitivity range from ISO 100 to 12,800. The CMOS sensor is equipped with phase autofocus sensors to enable particularly fast focusing in Live View using hybrid CMOS AF III. This system is also used in the mirrorless EOS M3 system camera, at the same year. A pre-series device showed impressively that the autofocus in Live View has finally become significantly faster after many attempts at Canon, even if it does not come close to the top models of other manufacturers. With an STM lens, however, the focus times were significantly less than one second instead of two to four seconds as before. The Digic 6 image processor is designed to give image processing a leap in the right direction. Although the 750D resolves six megapixels more than the 700D, the continuous shooting rate remains at five frames per second. The faster autofocus, however, remains the SLR autofocus when using the viewfinder. The autofocus works with 19 cross sensors and offers fast focusing and focus tracking, for example for sports shots.

Both sisters, we can call them like that, record videos with Full HD resolution in MP4 format. The new hybrid CMOS AF III, which is intended to provide smooth focus transitions and continuous focus tracking, is also effective here, especially with STM lenses. The 760D is reserved for creative effects for videos, such as an HDR movie function or the miniature effect. With a modern camera, of course, the WLAN must not be missing. Thanks to NFC, the EOS 750D and 760D can also be easily connected to a mobile device to transfer photos or remotely control the camera.

Ergonomics and workmanship

The two hobby DSLRs Canon EOS 750D and 760D are so identical and yet so different. The cases are made of well processed plastic, which makes a neat but not very high quality impression. Generous rubber coating on the thumb recess, the handle and the left side of the case provide the necessary grip in one or two hands. Whereby handle and thumb recess for “United States hands” might be better pronounced. SD memory card and lithium-ion battery are removed in separate compartments, which provides easy access to the memory card when using a tripod. The metal tripod thread sits properly in the optical axis anyway, not too large tripod exchange plates even grant access to the battery, which is sufficient for 440 pictures according to the CIPA standard. Again a solid value, but far removed from records. Thanks to a removable recess in the battery compartment, a dummy with cable power supply can be operated. In addition, the battery compartment, the plastic flap is easy to remove, offers connections for a multifunction handle.

 

In contrast to the 750D, the Canon EOS 760D has a second dial on the back as well as a proximity sensor on the viewfinder, which only switches off the display without Live View activated.

  • Canon EOS 750D and 760D

    The Canon EOS 750D and EOS 760D are made of well processed, but not exuberantly high quality plastic.

  • Canon EOS 750D and 760D

    On the back, the Canon EOS 750D and 760D have a rotating and swivelling touch screen. This measures 7.5 centimetres in the diagonal and resolves almost one million pixels.

    In contrast to the 750D, the Canon EOS 760D has a second dial on the back as well as a proximity sensor on the viewfinder, which only switches off the display without Live View activated.

Speaking of connections: These are all on the left side of the case. In addition to a cable remote trigger, an external stereo microphone can be plugged in, the mini HDMI socket and the USB connection are almost obligatory. And the fact that the rear screen can be swung to the side and rotated 270 degrees is already familiar from Canon’s three-digit DSLR series. It is the usual 7.5-centimeter touchscreen with a resolution of around one million pixels. Except for the readability in extremely bright lighting situations, the screen makes an excellent impression. Thanks to its mobility, it can also be flipped upside down against the camera. With the 750D, however, this is less recommended, as the screen is required as an info display. The 760D, on the other hand, has an additional info display on the top that provides information about the most important recording settings and the battery charge level even in the dark, as it can be illuminated by pressing a button.

The menus do not present Canon connoisseurs with any puzzles. The Japanese manufacturer works with tabs and avoids vertical scrolling, which saves the need to scroll through long menu lists. But the individual menu is somewhat hidden, Canon works with some advanced settings with submenus, such as the flash control. Especially the latter is not at all clearly arranged, which is due to the numerous adjustment possibilities. In the creative programs, there is also a menu that can be individually filled with preferred menu items. A quick menu allows access to settings that are not accessible via one of the numerous keys, so the main menu only needs to be used for more in-depth basic settings. If you like, you can call it up and operate it via the touchscreen as an alternative to key operation.

The optical viewfinder is still the preferred instrument for image composition in a DSLR, as it is energy-saving, can also be used in bright ambient light and, above all, offers faster autofocus. Unlike the 750D, the 760D has a proximity sensor on the viewfinder that conveniently turns off the screen. If, on the other hand, you take the 760D to your eye when Live View is activated, the screen is not switched off, the viewfinder remains dark due to the flipped-up mirror. Unfortunately it is not a “real” automatic switch between Live-View and SLR viewfinder. The simple viewfinder with a mirror construction instead of a pentaprism is unfortunately quite small, in the 35mm equivalent it offers only 0.5x magnification. The exit pupil, which is small at 19 millimetres, also presents spectacle wearers with the problem that the corners of the viewfinder are clearly shadowed because they cannot get close enough to the viewfinder. The dioptric correction is also quite modest. So you can’t really enjoy looking through the viewfinder, but you can work with it.

A somewhat unfortunate solution is the switch-on lever, which is located underneath the program selector wheel. The middle setting is for taking pictures, while the off mode and video mode are the end stops. As hard as the switch moves, in the heat of the moment you activate video mode instead of photo mode. The program selection wheels of the 750D and 760D differ slightly by the way. They sit in different places, but are both easily accessible. The 760D also offers a locking mechanism to prevent accidental adjustment, although this is also the case with the 750D thanks to its sluggishness and tidy detent. With the 750D you can almost do without a one-handed operation, only the menu button and the info button make sure that the left hand doesn’t feel superfluous. The 760D, on the other hand, has a second dial. Those who use the small APS-C-DSLR as a second camera for a larger DSLR or prefer the 760D as the sole camera and the advanced user interface of the 70D upwards will certainly have more fun with the 760D than with the 750D.

  • Canon EOS 750D and 760D

    The program selector wheel of the Canon EOS 750D sits on the right shoulder and, thanks to the fixed catch, doesn’t need a locking knob.

Equipment

In terms of equipment, the two sisters are almost identical again. All we could see was a difference: While the 760D has a simple spirit level for horizontal (but not vertical) alignment, the 750D lacks this. Otherwise, both models offer appropriate automatic modes for beginners and those who do not want to deal with technology, from fully automatic with motif recognition to selectable motif programs. Even in Live View, the two DSLRs can be used quite well, because Canon has finally helped the autofocus on the jumps. The shutter release delay, whether in Live View or using the mirror viewfinder, is equally fast at less than 0.1 seconds. This is mainly due to the fact that, unlike most first DSLRs with Live View, the mirror does not fold down again before triggering. In addition, this even ensures a quieter triggering in the Live View compared to the classic viewfinder, since the mirror stroke is eliminated. The mechanical shutter also provides an audible background noise.

If the autofocus is added, the viewfinder again plays out its advantages. After a maximum of 0.4 seconds, the subject is focused and captured, while in Live View, double time elapses. Compared to the predecessor models, which sometimes struggled to focus for seconds in Live View, this is a huge step forward. Focus tracking during video recording has also improved, although mirrorless cameras are much faster here. The domain of the DSLR is and remains the delay- and pixel-free mirror finder.

Speaking of video: The 750D and 760D record at maximum in Full HD resolution (1,920 x 1,080 pixels) at only 25 frames per second. If you switch down to HD resolution (1,280 x 720 pixels), 50 frames per second are also possible. But with a little trick one gets to further image change settings: If the video system is switched from PAL to NTSC in the settings, 30p and 24p are available in Full HD resolution, 30p and 60p in HD and 30p in VGA. The audio level of the videos can be adjusted manually if desired, there is also a wind filter that can be switched on. An external stereo microphone can also be connected instead of the internal stereo microphone. The scene and creative modes P, A, S and M are also available, so that the videographer, just like the photographer, can influence the aperture, exposure time and ISO sensitivity. With manual focus, however, only a focus loupe is available, which lacks the modern and useful function of focus peaking.

When taking continuous pictures, the photographer can only dream of refresh rates such as 25 or even 50 frames per second. Canon promises five continuous shots per second. A promise that the 750D and 760D cannot quite keep in practice. They manage around 4.6 continuous shots per second, whereby the speed breaks down in Raw after only a few shots. Interestingly, the 750D creates one more image at high speed in raw (seven instead of six), while the 760D creates three more images in JPEG (19 instead of 16). Even in the subsequent continuous run, the 750D is slightly faster for raws with identical memory cards, while the 760D is slightly faster for JPEGs.

  • Canon EOS 750D and 760D

    The Canon EOS 750D and the 760D with the EF-S 18-135 mm IS STM, which is available in the set with the 750D, came to the test. The 760D, on the other hand, is only offered by Canon without a lens.

The Canons have an integrated pop-up flash, which can even jump up automatically in the scene modes as soon as the automatic mode thinks that the flash would be useful. In the creative programs, the photographer has to unfold the flash himself at the push of a button. When the flash is activated and the ambient light is low, the autofocus auxiliary light becomes active in the form of very unattractive flash salvoes, while the built-in LED on the front of the camera serves only as an indicator, for example for self-timer shots. Fortunately, the flash salvo can be deactivated as an autofocus auxiliary light in the depths of the main menu. For those who find dead-flashed subjects with drop shadows and possibly red eyes too boring, you can use an external flash from Canon or a compatible one on the TTL flash shoe. It becomes even more interesting when the external flash unit(s) are remotely controlled wirelessly via TTL – this even works with the internal flash as control unit, so an additional control unit is not required on the camera.

Depending on the program, the Canon allows an adjustment of the image parameters. In addition to various presets, all of which can be individually adjusted in contrast, color, etc., there are also memory spaces for individual settings. Also filter effects like blur or fisheye are not missing. In playback mode, JPEG images can be retrofitted with filter effects such as a toy camera or grainy black and white. This is also the only way to convert raw images in the camera into a JPEG, because the filters can also be used for raw images, the result is saved as a new photo. Above all, it is useful to be able to evaluate images in the camera and thus make a preselection for later image processing on the PC, without having to delete less well-founded images at first glance.

If you like, you can also send the photos to compatible devices via WLAN. This can be a smartphone or tablet equipped with the appropriate Canon app. The app is available free of charge for iOS and Android. It also allows the remote control of the camera including live image transmission and all kinds of settings directly on the screen of the smart device. Those who prefer to configure their Canon on the camera itself can still trigger it remotely by using the appropriate cable.

Picture quality

Although the tests of the two models with the same lens show minimal deviations, these are so small that we will look at the cameras together below. The laboratory test was carried out with the 18-135 mm STM, which Canon also offers as a set with the EOS 750D. The 760D, on the other hand, is only sold without a lens.

  • Canon EOS 750D and 760D

    The battery and SD memory card of the Canon EOS 750D and 760D are removed separately. This makes it particularly easy to access the memory card.

Typical for a lens with a larger zoom factor, the 18-135mm shows high distortion, which is strongly barrel-shaped at the short end of the focal length with three percent, and strongly cushion-shaped at the medium and long focal lengths with 1.5 percent. Depending on the subject, these distortions can be very disturbing. Depending on the aperture and focal length, an edge darkening is also visible in the corners. It is most noticeable when the aperture is open. Especially in wide-angle, it is somewhat more powerful and remains more stable even with a clear fade than with longer focal lengths. In addition, the visible colour fringes are unattractive. They are clearly visible in the wide angle, above all at the edge of the image and in telescopic position, there also further towards the image centre. Only at medium focal length the color fringes are slightly smaller, but still visible. The correction of optical errors is therefore not part of the strength of the lens. If, on the other hand, the electronic correction is added in the camera that is switched off at the factory, these optical errors are reduced in the JPEG images. The raws can also be corrected with appropriate image processing programs.

At a resolution of 50 percent edge contrast, up to 50 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) are achieved. This is a good resolution, but also no record for a 24 megapixel. Canon was once known for its aggressive image processing, but this has now become much more cautious than other manufacturers who already tickle a resolution of 50 lp/mm out of 16 megapixel sensors. On the other hand, the sharpening artifacts of the 750D and 760D are not so strong. The highest resolution is 18-135mm at short and medium focal lengths, each with two stops. The telephoto resolution is somewhat lower overall, but with a maximum of 45 lp/mm it also achieves good values. With the 18-135mm, however, one has to live with a high loss of resolution towards the edge of the picture, which is especially strong and therefore visible in the wide angle. The least loss of resolution is towards the edge of the picture at medium focal length, in particular when the lens is dimmed down there is almost no difference to the centre of the picture.

The signal-to-noise ratio reaches a good value of more than 40 dB at low ISO sensitivities, but already drops slightly below this value at ISO 400. From ISO 1.600, the measured value is already critical at just under 35 dB. From this sensitivity value, brightness noise is also easily visible. It increases with each further ISO level and becomes dominant from ISO 12.800 onwards. The colour noise, on the other hand, is well under Canon’s control. In spite of the increasing noise at higher sensitivities, which indicates a not too strong noise reduction, the image details decrease strongly here. At ISO 400 a slight loss can be measured, at ISO 1.600 the loss of detail is already easily visible, at even higher sensitivities image details are clearly lost. Canon also doesn’t stain itself with fame when it comes to input dynamics. Although this is good up to ISO 1,600 with just over ten f-stops, it then plummets rapidly. At ISO 6.400 there are only nine f-stops left and at the highest sensitivity of ISO 25.600 only 7.5.

The tonal value curve is divided, the images appear rich in contrast. However, the measurement of the output tonal range shows that Canon rapidly loses fine brightness gradations at higher sensitivities. While at ISO 100 and 200 still more than 224 of 256 possible gradations are achieved at 8 bits and also the value of more than 192 steps at ISO 400 is still in the good range, the value above this drops rapidly. Up to ISO 1,600, however, there are still acceptable 128 or more gradations. At ISO 6.400, however, they are only below 96 and at maximum sensitivity only 64 of the original 256 brightness levels. With the actual color depth, it looks good up to ISO 3,200, but even here the value drops sharply at higher sensitivities. After all, most colors are reproduced quite accurately, larger deviations only appear in the range from red to magenta. Yellow, green, blue and purple tones, on the other hand, are reproduced very accurately. Also the white balance works very satisfactorily, in particular manually set, as in the laboratory test, it works perfectly.

  • Canon EOS 750D and 760D

    If Canon had placed the battery in the handle, the distance to the tripod thread would be greater. But this is also sufficient for the Canon EOS 750D and 760D, at least when using small tripod exchange plates.

The Canon EOS 750D and 760D achieve their highest image quality at ISO 100 and 200, but also at ISO 400 the losses are small. Up to ISO 1.600 the image quality remains acceptable good, but above this there are clear limitations. Particularly at higher ISO sensitivities, the canons do not quite reach the level of DSLR competition and mirrorless system cameras with 24 megapixel APS-C sensors.

Bottom line

With the EOS 750D and 760D, Canon now divides its hobby DSLR class into two very similar sister models, which does not make the purchase decision any easier. Those who like to make manual adjustments more often will be better advised with the 760D, especially thanks to the two adjustment wheels and the info display. Thus this camera is also a meaningful extension of the three-digit series from Canon. Otherwise, the two models shine more with their balance than with highlights. They offer a good overall package in terms of equipment, speed and workmanship, as well as ergonomics, without distinguishing themselves from the (remaining) mass of hobby DSLRs. The new 24-megapixel sensor delivers good image quality with high resolution, but at high sensitivities beyond ISO 1,600 Canon lags slightly behind the competition when it comes to image quality.

Fact sheet
Manufacturer Canon
Model EOS 750D
Sensor CMOS APS-C 22.5 x 15.0 mm (crop factor 1.6
)24.7 megapixels (physical)
24.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 3.7 µm
Resolution (max.) 5.328 x 4.000 (4:3)
Video (max.) 1.920 x 1.080 30p
Lens Canon EF-S 18-135 mm 3.5-5.6 IS STM (zoom lens)
Reflex viewfinder Mirror viewfinder, 95 percent image field coverage, 0.82x magnification (sensor-related), 0.51x magnification (KB equivalent), 19 mm eye distance, diopter correction from -3.0 to 1.0 dpt, fixed focusing screen
Monitor 3.0″ (7.7 cm)
Disbandment 1.040.000 pixels
tiltable
rotatable yes
swivelling yes
Touchscreen yes
AV connector HDMI Mini Output (Type C)
Fully automatic yes
Automatic motif control yes
Motif programmes 12
Program automation yes
Program shift yes
Aperture priority yes
Aperture priority yes
Manual yes
Bulb long time exposure yes
HDR function yes
Panorama function no
Exposure metering Matrix/multi-field measurement (63 fields), center-weighted integral measurement, spot measurement
fastest shutter speed 1/4.000 s
Lightning bolt built-in flash
Synchronous time 1/200 s
Flash connection Flash shoe: Canon, standard centre contact
WLAN yes
NFC yes
GPS external, wired or plug-on receiver
Remote release yes, cable release, infrared release, remote control via Smartphone/Tablet
Interval shooting
Storage medium
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
Sensitivity
automatic ISO 100-6.400
manually ISO 100-25.600
White balance
automatic yes
manual measurement yes
Kelvin input
Fine correction yes
Autofocus yes
Number of measuring fields 19 Cross sensors
Speed Phase Auto Focus: 0.24 s to 0.36 sLive View Auto Focus
: 0.64 s to 1.04 s
AF auxiliary light LED
Dimensions (mm) 133 x 100 x 79 mm
Weight (ready for operation) 550 g (housing only
)1.010 g (with lens)
Tripod socket in optical axis
Zoom
Zoom adjustment manual on lens
Battery life 440 images (according to CIPA standard)
– = “not applicable” or “not available”
Fact sheet
Manufacturer Canon
Model EOS 760D
Sensor CMOS APS-C 22.5 x 15.0 mm (crop factor 1.6
)24.7 megapixels (physical)
24.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 3.7 µm
Resolution (max.) 5.328 x 4.000 (4:3)
Video (max.) 1.920 x 1.080 30p
Lens Canon EF-S 18-135 mm 3.5-5.6 IS STM (zoom lens)
Reflex viewfinder Mirror viewfinder, 95 percent image field coverage, 0.82x magnification (sensor-related), 0.51x magnification (KB equivalent), 19 mm eye distance, diopter correction from -3.0 to 1.0 dpt, fixed focusing screen
Monitor 3.0″ (7.7 cm)
Disbandment 1.040.000 pixels
tiltable
rotatable yes
swivelling yes
Touchscreen yes
AV connector HDMI Mini Output (Type C)
Fully automatic yes
Automatic motif control yes
Motif programmes 10
Program automation yes
Program shift yes
Aperture priority yes
Aperture priority yes
Manual yes
Bulb long time exposure yes
HDR function yes
Panorama function no
Exposure metering Matrix/multi-field measurement (63 fields), center-weighted integral measurement, spot measurement
fastest shutter speed 1/4.000 s
Lightning bolt built-in flash
Synchronous time 1/200 s
Flash connection Flash shoe: Canon, standard centre contact
WLAN yes
NFC yes
GPS external, wired or plug-on receiver
Remote release yes, cable release, infrared release, remote control via Smartphone/Tablet
Interval shooting
Storage medium
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
Sensitivity
automatic ISO 100-6.400
manually ISO 100-25.600
White balance
automatic yes
manual measurement yes
Kelvin input
Fine correction yes
Autofocus yes
Number of measuring fields 19 Cross sensors
Speed Phase Auto Focus: 0.25 s to 0.39 sLive View Auto Focus
: 0.63 s to 0.86 s
AF auxiliary light LED
Dimensions (mm) 132 x 101 x 78 mm
Weight (ready for operation) 560 g (housing only
)1.020 g (with lens)
Tripod socket in optical axis
Zoom
Zoom adjustment manual on lens
Battery life 440 images (according to CIPA standard)
– = “not applicable” or “not available”

Short evaluation

Pros

  • EOS 760D with info display and two setting wheels
  • Low triggering delay also in Live View
  • Good image quality with high resolution at low ISO sensitivities

Cons

  • No electronic spirit level in the 750D
  • Handle not sufficiently pronounced
  • Unlucky combination of on/off switch and video mode
  • Above ISO 1.600 slightly poorer image quality than the competition
  • Reflex viewfinder is quite small

Canon EOS 750D Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor APS-C 22.5 x 15.0 mm (crop factor 1.6
)24.7 megapixels (physical) and 24.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 3.7 µm
Photo resolution
6.000 x 3.368 pixels (16:9)
5.328 x 4.000 pixels (4:3)
4.240 x 2.832 pixels (3:2)
4.000 x 4.000 pixels (1:1)
3.984 x 2.656 pixels (3:2)
3.984 x 2.240 pixels (16:9)
3.552 x 2.664 pixels (4:3)
2.976 x 1.984 pixels (3:2)
2.976 x 1.680 pixels (16:9)
2.656 x 2.656 pixels (1:1)
2.656 x 1.992 pixels (4:3)
1.984 x 1.984 pixels (1:1)
1.920 x 1.280 pixels (3:2)
1.920 x 1.080 Pixel (16:9)
1.696 x 1.280 pixels (4:3)
1.280 x 1.280 pixels (1:1)
720 x 480 pixels (3:2)
640 x 480 pixels (4:3)
480 x 480 pixels (1:1)
Picture formats JPG, RAW
Colour depth 24 bits (8 bits per color channel), 42 bits (14 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard (version 2.0)
Video resolution
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 30 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 25 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 24 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 60 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 50 p
640 x 480 (4:3) 25 p
x
Maximum recording time 29 min 59 sec
Video format
MOV (Codec H.264)
Audio format (video) WAV

Lens

Lens mount
Canon EF-S

Focusing

Autofocus mode Phase comparison autofocus with 19 cross sensors, autofocus working range from 0 EV to 18 EV, contrast autofocus
Autofocus Functions Single Auto Focus, Continuous Auto Focus, Tracking Auto Focus, Manual, AFL Function, AF Assist Light (LED), Focus Magnifier (10x)
Focus control Depth of field control, dimming button, Live View

Viewfinder and Monitor

Reflex viewfinder Reflex viewfinder (95 % image coverage), 19 mm eye relief with 0.82 x magnification (0.5 x KB equivalent), diopter compensation (-3.0 to +1.0 dpt)
Monitor 3.0″ (7.7 cm) TFT LCD monitor with 1,040,000 pixels, anti-reflective, brightness adjustable, rotatable 180°, rotatable 270°, with touch screen

Exposure

Exposure metering Centre-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement over 63 fields, spot measurement (measurement over 6 % or 4 % of the image field)
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 30 s (automatic
)1/4,000 to 30 s (manual)
Bulb function
Exposure control Fully Automatic, Program Automatic (with Program Shift), Aperture Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual
Bracketing function Bracket function with maximum 3 shots, step size from 1/3 to 2 EV, HDR function
Exposure compensation -5.0 to +5.0 EV with step size of 1/3 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 100 to ISO 6.400 (automatic
)ISO 100 to ISO 25.600 (manual)
Remote access Remote release, cable release, infrared release, remote control via smartphone/tablet
Motives Candlelight, Children, Landscape, Night scene, Night portrait, Close-up, Portrait, Food, Sports/Action, Fully automatic, 2 additional scene modes
Picture effects Fisheye, HDR effect, miniature effect, monochrome, toy camera, blur, b/w filter in yellow/orange/red/green, b/w tint effects in blue/violet/green, 2 additional image effects
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sun, White balance bracket, Fine-tune, Shadow, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 1 presets, Incandescent lamp with 1 presets, Manual
Color space Adobe RGB, sRGB
Continuous shooting Continuous shooting function max. 5.0 frames/s at highest resolution and max. 940 stored photos or 8 RAW images
Self-timer Self-timer at intervals of 2 s, special features: or 10 s (optional)
Shooting functions Mirror lock-up, AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Lightning bolt built-in flash (hinged
)flash shoe: Canon, standard centre contact
Flash range Flash sync time 1/200 s
Flash number Guide number 12 (ISO 100)
Flash functions Auto, Fill-in flash, Flash on, Flash off, High speed sync, Long time sync, Flash on second shutter curtain, Red-eye reduction by lamp, Master function (4 channels and 2 groups), Flash exposure compensation from -2.0 EV to +2.0 EV

Equipment

Image stabilizer no optical image stabilizer
Memory
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
GPS function GPS external (wired or plug-on receiver)
Power supply Power supply connection
Power supply 1 x Canon LP-E17440
images according to CIPA standardCanon
ACK-E18 power supply unit
Playback Functions Red eye retouching, crop images, image rotation, protect image, playback histogram, playback magnifier, image index, slide show function with fade effects, zoom out
Voice memo Voice memo (WAV format)
Face recognition Face recognition
Picture parameters Sharpness, Contrast, Saturation, Noise Reduction
Special functions Grid can be faded in, orientation sensor, Live View
Ports Data interfaces: USBUSB type
:USB 2.0 High SpeedWLAN
: availableNFC
: available
AV connectors AV output: HDMI output Mini (Type C
)Audio input: yes (3.5 mm jack (stereo, 3-pin))
Audio output: no
Supported direct printing methods Canon Direct Print, PictBridge
Tripod socket 1/4″ in optical axis
Features and Miscellaneous built-in low-pass filter with dust protection functionDIGIC-6 signal processorHighlight

Tone PriorityAuto
Lighting Optimizer Simultaneous
JPEG and RAW recording possibleFlicker detectionMultishot

noise reductionObjective auto-correction

Size and weight

Dimensions W x H x D 133 x 100 x 79 mm
Weight 550 g (operational)

Other

included accessories Canon LC-E18 Charger for Special BatteriesCanon
LP-E17 Special BatteryCanon
RF-3 (Housing Cover)
Video Connection CableUSB Connection CableBajonet CoverCarrying StrapCD-ROMBedienungsanleitung
optional accessory Canon ACK-E18 AC adapterCanon
BG-E18 Rechargeable battery/battery handle

 

Canon EOS 760D Datasheet

Electronics

Sensor CMOS sensor APS-C 22.5 x 15.0 mm (crop factor 1.6
)24.7 megapixels (physical) and 24.2 megapixels (effective)
Pixel pitch 3.7 µm
Photo resolution
6.000 x 3.368 pixels (16:9)
5.328 x 4.000 pixels (4:3)
4.240 x 2.832 pixels (3:2)
4.000 x 4.000 pixels (1:1)
3.984 x 2.656 pixels (3:2)
3.984 x 2.240 pixels (16:9)
3.552 x 2.664 pixels (4:3)
2.976 x 1.984 pixels (3:2)
2.976 x 1.680 pixels (16:9)
2.656 x 2.656 pixels (1:1)
2.656 x 1.992 pixels (4:3)
1.984 x 1.984 pixels (1:1)
1.920 x 1.280 pixels (3:2)
1.920 x 1.080 Pixel (16:9)
1.696 x 1.280 pixels (4:3)
1.280 x 1.280 pixels (1:1)
720 x 480 pixels (3:2)
640 x 480 pixels (4:3)
480 x 480 pixels (1:1)
Picture formats JPG, RAW
Colour depth 24 bits (8 bits per color channel), 42 bits (14 bits per color channel)
Metadata Exif (version 2.3), DCF standard (version 2.0)
Video resolution
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 30 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 25 p
1.920 x 1.080 (16:9) 24 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 60 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 50 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 30 p
1.280 x 720 (16:9) 25 p
640 x 480 (4:3) 30 p
640 x 480 (4:3) 25 p
Maximum recording time 29 min 59 sec
Video format
MOV (Codec H.264)
Audio format (video) WAV

Lens

Lens mount
Canon EF-S

Focusing

Autofocus mode Phase comparison autofocus with 19 cross sensors, autofocus working range from 0 EV to 18 EV, contrast autofocus
Autofocus Functions Single Auto Focus, Continuous Auto Focus, Tracking Auto Focus, Manual, AFL Function, AF Assist Light (LED), Focus Magnifier (10x)
Focus control Depth of field control, dimming button, Live View

Viewfinder and Monitor

Reflex viewfinder Reflex viewfinder (95 % image coverage), 19 mm eye relief with 0.82 x magnification (0.5 x KB equivalent), diopter compensation (-3.0 to +1.0 dpt)
Monitor 3.0″ (7.7 cm) TFT LCD monitor with 1,040,000 pixels, anti-reflective, brightness adjustable, rotatable 180°, rotatable 270°, with touch screen
Info display additional info display (top) with illumination

Exposure

Exposure metering Centre-weighted integral measurement, matrix/multi-field measurement over 63 fields, spot measurement (measurement over 6 % or 4 % of the image field)
Exposure times 1/4,000 to 30 s (automatic
)1/4,000 to 30 s (manual)
Bulb function
Exposure control Fully Automatic, Program Automatic (with Program Shift), Aperture Priority, Aperture Priority, Manual
Bracketing function Bracket function with maximum 3 shots, step size from 1/3 to 2 EV, HDR function
Exposure compensation -5.0 to +5.0 EV with step size of 1/3 EV
Sensitivity to light ISO 100 to ISO 6.400 (automatic
)ISO 100 to ISO 25.600 (manual)
Remote access Remote release, cable release, infrared release, remote control via smartphone/tablet
Motives Children, Landscape, Night scene, Night portrait, Close-up, Portrait, Food, Sports/Action, Fully automatic, 1 additional scene modes
Picture effects Fisheye, HDR effect, miniature effect, monochrome, toy camera, blur, b/w filter in yellow/orange/red/green, b/w tint effects in blue/violet/green, 2 additional image effects
White balance Auto, Cloudy, Sun, White balance bracket, Fine-tune, Shadow, Flash, Fluorescent lamp with 1 presets, Incandescent lamp with 1 presets, Manual
Color space Adobe RGB, sRGB
Continuous shooting Continuous shooting function max. 5.0 frames/s at highest resolution and max. 940 stored photos or 8 RAW images
Self-timer Self-timer at intervals of 2 s, special features: or 10 s (optional)
Shooting functions Mirror lock-up, AEL function, AFL function, live histogram

Flashgun

Lightning bolt built-in flash (hinged
)flash shoe: Canon, standard centre contact
Flash range Flash sync time 1/200 s
Flash number Guide number 12 (ISO 100)
Flash functions Auto, Fill-in flash, Flash on, Flash off, High speed sync, Long time sync, Flash on second shutter curtain, Red-eye reduction by lamp, Master function (4 channels and 2 groups), Flash exposure compensation from -2.0 EV to +2.0 EV

Equipment

Image stabilizer no optical image stabilizer
Memory
SD (SDHC, SDXC, UHS I)
GPS function GPS external (wired or plug-on receiver)
Microphone Stereo
Power supply Power supply connection
Power supply 1 x Canon LP-E17440
images according to CIPA standardCanon
ACK-E18 power supply unit
Playback Functions Red eye retouching, crop images, rotate images, protect images, highlight / shadow warning, playback histogram, playback magnifier with 10.0x magnification, image index, slide show function with fade effects, zoom out
Voice memo Voice memo (WAV format)
Face recognition Face recognition
Picture parameters Sharpness, Contrast, Saturation, Noise Reduction
Special functions Grid can be faded in, orientation sensor, Live View
Ports Data interfaces: USBUSB type
:USB 2.0 High SpeedWLAN
: availableNFC
: available
AV connectors AV output: HDMI output Mini (Type C
)Audio input: yes (3.5 mm jack (stereo, 3-pin))
Audio output: no
Supported direct printing methods Canon Direct Print, PictBridge
Tripod socket 1/4″ in optical axis
Features and Miscellaneous built-in low-pass filter with dust protection functionDIGIC-6 signal processing processorHighlight

Tone PriorityAuto
Lighting Optimizer simultaneous
JPEG and RAW recording possibleFlicker detectionMultishot

noise reductionLens auto-correctionEye sensor manual

sound control possibleHDR movie function
(1280×720)

Size and weight

Dimensions W x H x D 132 x 101 x 78 mm
Weight 560 g (ready for operation)

Other

included accessories Canon LC-E18 Charger for Special BatteriesCanon
LP-E17 Special BatteryCanon
RF-3 (Housing Cover)
Video Connection CableUSB Connection CableHarnessCD-ROMBedienungsanleitung
optional accessory Canon ACK-E18 AC AdapterCanon
Ef (Eyecup)
Canon BG-E18 Battery GripCanon
E-2 Hand Strap Other AccessoriesCanon
GP-E2 (GPS Receiver)
Canon RC-6 Infrared Remote Control (Infrared Remote Control)
Canon RS-60E3 Cable Remote ControlCanon AngleFinder C (Angle Finder

)

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