CAMERAS Canon Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) vs Rebel T7 (EOS...

Canon Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) vs Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) Comparison

-

Canon Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) vs Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) Comparison

Home CAMERAS Canon Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) vs Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) Comparison

Entry level DSLRs Canon Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) and Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) Compared

With the Rebel T7 (Canon EOS 2000D in the rest of the world) and especially the Rebel  T100 (Canon EOS 4000D elsewhere), Canon introduces two low-cost DSLRs for the entry-level market, which are mainly characterized by their low price, but still offer DSLR image quality. Thereby, Canon does not even shy away from a plastic bayonet in the Rebel T100  (4000D), but in the Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D), the successor of the Canon Rebel T6 (Canon EOS 1300D elsewhere) , a metal bayonet is used.

Surely nobody missed this, but Canon still brings back the plastic bayonet with the Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D). [Photo: Canon]

The Canon Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D), on the other hand, uses a more robust metal bayonet, and the image sensor also has a higher resolution of 24 megapixels than both the Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) and its predecessor, the Canon Rebel T6 (Canon EOS 1300D elsewhere), which both have to make do with 18 megapixels. [Photo: Canon]

Furthermore, printed buttons have fallen victim to the austerity dictates, and there is also no longer a dedicated on/off switch; instead, the camera is switched on via the program dial. Even with a set lens, savings are made; it has to get by without an optical image stabilizer. Canon has even made considerable savings on the rear screen: it measures just 6.8 centimeters diagonally on the Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) and has a resolution of a measly 230,000 pixels. After all, the Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) uses a 7.5 centimeter screen with a resolution of 920,000 pixels.

Save on the back of the Canon Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D): The screen is 6.8 centimetres small and the buttons are not printed, instead the functions are on the housing. [Photo: Canon]

The Canon Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) has the larger 7.5 cm screen and has printed buttons. [Photo: Canon]

The Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) at least gets an image sensor with 24 megapixels higher resolution in APS-C format (crop factor 1.6), while the Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) has to get along with 18 megapixels like the old Canon Rebel T6 (Canon EOS 1300D elsewhere). The maximum sensitivity reaches ISO 6,400, an extension to ISO 12,800 is possible after activation in the menu. The Digic 4+ image processor is also an old acquaintance, already driving the Canon Rebel T6 (Canon EOS 1300D elsewhere). The reflex viewfinder of both cameras has to make do with a simple mirror construction instead of a high-quality pentaprism. At 0.8x magnification (0.5x in 35 mm equivalent), it covers 95 percent of the image field. The autofocus works in viewfinder mode with nine measuring points, only the middle autofocus point is a cross sensor. The continuous-advance mode only takes three frames per second.

Even on the upper side, the Canon Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) has a budget dictate: the camera is switched on and off via the program dial instead of via a separate switch. [Photo: Canon]

The Canon Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D), on the other hand, has a proper switch for switching on and off. This way the program selector wheel remains in the last used position. [Photo: Canon]

Even with the video function, the entry-level photographer has to be satisfied with Full HD standard fare (1,920 by 1,080 pixels at 30 frames per second). During live viewing and video recording, only a contrast autofocus is available, while the faster dual-pixel CMOS AF is reserved for higher-quality EOS models. Both the Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) and Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) detect subjects automatically, but can also be controlled manually by the photographer. They also offer some creative filter functions. WLAN is also on board in both models to transfer photos wirelessly to computers, smartphones or other devices and to control the cameras remotely via app. NFC for simple coupling, however, is only offered by the Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D). Both the cameras themselves and the Canon Photo Companion app provide helpful instructions on how to take various photo subjects.

The Canon Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) is available in a set with the EF-S 18-55 mm F3.5-5.6 III for just under 400 dollars. [Photo: Canon]

The Canon Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) is available in a set with the EF-S 18-55 mm F3.5-5.6 IS II for just under 500 dollars. [Photo: Canon]

One important thing buyers of the Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) and Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) should still keep in mind: Although they are fully compatible with the many EF and EF-S lenses, Canon alone offers more than 80 different models, the flash shoes no longer have center contacts. The Speedlite flashes from Canon don’t mind this, but to what extent third-party flashes are affected can’t be said at the moment. Simple center contact flashes logically do not work anyway. The Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) and Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) differ in one small additional point when it comes to the flash: the on-board flash has to be folded up manually on the Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D), while the Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) has an automatic and a button to fold it out.

The Canon Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) and Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) are available since 2018, whereas the Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) with the EF-S 18-55 mm F3.5-5.6 IS II should cost almost 500 Euros, while the Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) together with the EF-S 18-55 F3.5-5.6 III (without IS) should be available for almost 400 Euros. The predecessor model Canon Rebel T6 (Canon EOS 1300D elsewhere), however, is already available with an image stabilized lens from a good 370 euro, so that we can’t recommend the worse equipped and more expensive Rebel T100 (EOS 4000D) to anyone with a clear conscience at the moment. The Rebel T7 (EOS 2000D) offers a higher sensor resolution after all.

Peter Dench
Peter Dench
I am Peter Dench. Digital Photographer, born in London 1972, currently living in Deerfield, near Chicago. I have numerous photography expositions and also working in model photography. In this website, PhotoPoint, I usually review cameras provided by local dealers in Illinois and by the manufacturers. Sometimes I, Peter Dench, review lenses too, but only when I have a suitable camera for them. Please let me know in the comments if I can improve any of these articles.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest Articles

Nikon D100 Review

Nikon D100 Review Those who have always dreamed of continuing to use their existing Nikon equipment - and especially the...

Leica X Vario (Type 107) Review

Leica X Vario (Type 107) Review: Leica X Vario with APS-C sensor and zoom lens - New addition to...

Sealife DC2000 Review

Sealife DC2000 Review Underwater and outdoor cameras are rather marbled by the image results thanks to the very small image...

Nikon 1 AW1 Review: Waterproof and Shockproof Digital System Camera

Nikon 1 AW1 Review: Nikon 1 AW1 Waterproof and Shockproof Digital System Camera    Up to now, you could only take...

Canon PowerShot S110 Review

Canon PowerShot S110 Review The Canon PowerShot S110 is a WLAN camera with manual control and touch display optically zooms...

Panasonic Lumix FZ35 (FZ38) Review

Panasonic Lumix FZ35 (FZ38) Review Panasonic has accepted the challenge of its competitors and is sending the Lumix DMC-FZ35 (FZ38...

Nikon D4 Review

Nikon D4 Review: A Professional Model With Additional Features This is the review of the successful Nikon D4. The successor...

Canon Rebel SL3 Review (EOS 250D)

Canon Rebel SL3 Review (EOS 250D): Compact and lightweight - Now with 4K video and eye autofocus (Eye AF) The...

Panasonic ZS5 (Lumix DMC-TZ8) Review

Panasonic ZS5 (Lumix DMC-TZ8) Review For the Panasonic ZS5 (Panasonic Lumix TZ8 elsewhere) travel zoom camera, the bar was set...

Panasonic Lumix G1 Review

Panasonic Lumix G1 Review With the introduction of the Panasonic Lumix G1, Panasonic caused quite a stir with its "EVIL...

Sony a57 Review: System Camera With Ten Frames Per Second

Sony a57 Review (Sony Alpha SLT-A57): System Camera With Ten Frames Per Second With the introduction of the Sony a57,...

Fujifilm X-A7 Review

Fujifilm X-A7 Review: Fujifilm X-A7 entry-level model with extra-large touch screen introduced - Now with true 4K video capability The...

Nikon Coolpix P7800 Review: Just A Slightly Improved P7700

Nikon Coolpix P7800 Review: It Is Just An Improved P7700? This is the complete review of the Nikon Coolpix P7800....

Panasonic Lumix ZS10 Review (TZ20 / TZ22)

Panasonic Lumix ZS10 Review (TZ20 / TZ22) The range of super-zoom compact cameras is very dense, so manufacturers have to...

Sony a7R IV Review

Sony a7R IV review: Sony Alpha 7R IV with 61 Mpx- Mirrorless High-End Camera With the Sony a7R IV (Alpha...

Sony Alpha 6100 Review

Sony Alpha 6100 Review: Mirrorless APS-C system camera of the upper entry-level With the two new models, the Alpha 6100...

Sony Alpha 6600 Review

Sony Alpha 6600 Review: APS-C flagship camera Sony's new APS-C flagship model is the Sony Alpha 6600, which is the...

Sony a37 Review

Sony a37 Review The Sony SLT Alpha 37 (Sony a37 as it is known by photographers) is aimed at entry-level...

Sony RX0 II Review: Actioncam With Moving Display and Internal 4K Recording

Sony RX0 II Review:  Actioncam With Moving Display and Internal 4K Recording This is the review of the Sony RX0...

Nikon Z50 Review

Nikon Z50 Review: Mirrorless Nikon Z50 with APS-C sensor and lenses (16-50 and 50-250 mm) With the Nikon Z50, Nikon...

Canon EOS M6 Mark II Review

Canon EOS M6 Mark II Review With the Canon EOS M6 Mark II, Canon introduced a 32.5-megapixel resolution SLR system...

Canon EOS M200 Review

Canon EOS M200 Review: Canon EOS M200 for compact and affordable mirrorless entry - Now with 4K video and...

Olympus EM5 Mark III Review

Olympus EM5 Mark III Review: Olympus EM5 Mark III with 4K video and phase autofocus After the OM-D E-M1 X,...

Fujifilm FinePix X10 Review

Fujifilm FinePix X10 Review With the Fujifilm FinePix X10, Fujifilm combines classic design and high-quality workmanship with the concept of...

Olympus E10 Review

Olympus E10 Review Olympus is making public the new flagship among its digital cameras, which is the Olympus E10, revealing...

Sony Cybershot HX95 And HX99 Reviews

Sony CyberShot DSC-HX95 and HX99 with 24-720mm zoom: Two Similar Compact Travel Cameras With the two models Cybershot DSC-HX95 and...

Nikon Coolpix A Review

Nikon Coolpix A Review: Nikon Brings Nikon Coolpix A With A Large Image Sensor Nikon releases the Nikon Coolpix A...

Panasonic Lumix G95 (Lumix G90-G91) Review

Panasonic Lumix G95 (Lumix G90-G91) Review With the Panasonic Lumix G95 (Lumix G90 in the European Union and Britain,...

Samsung NX1000 Review

Samsung NX1000 Review This is the complete review of the Samsung NX1000. At Samsung, the system camera series is called...

Panasonic Lumix ZS7 (TZ10) Review

Panasonic Lumix ZS7 (TZ10) Review Panasonic's new top model of compact super-zoom cameras is the new Panasonic Lumix ZS7 (TZ10...
- Advertisement -

Canon PowerShot S110 Review

Canon PowerShot S110 Review The Canon PowerShot S110 is a WLAN camera with manual control and touch display optically zooms...

Panasonic Lumix FZ35 (FZ38) Review

Panasonic Lumix FZ35 (FZ38) Review Panasonic has accepted the challenge of its competitors and is sending the Lumix DMC-FZ35 (FZ38...

Must read

Nikon D100 Review

Nikon D100 Review Those who have always dreamed of continuing...

Leica X Vario (Type 107) Review

Leica X Vario (Type 107) Review: Leica X Vario...
- Advertisement -

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you